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I'm going to store my N400 in temperature controlled storage this winter. Would storing on a rear spooled pitbull paddock stand be better than the side stand?

Thanks
 

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I store it on the side stand. Otherwise, for the rear wheel it would be better but not sure if the pressure from tipping the bike forward on the front wheel would matter or not. If you're worried about this, then get a rear and front stands. In general, don't worry about it, especially if you have street tires.

What I do is overinflate a bit the tires and place some cardboard or plywood under the wheels to avoid humidity (even though I think it is overdone but it does not cost much in effort or money and can protect the ground in case you have a spillage).
 

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I've always just had my bike on a sidestand, and I've never noticed any issue with the tires.
 

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Same here. Just in case, I would go out every month and roll the bike forward a bit to change the spot where the tire is on the ground. If nothing else, it made me feel better. The other thing is fill your gas tank to the very tip top so that there is no room for water to get in (theoretically anyhow). I've stayed away from fuel stabilizers as they are really there to just save the gas, not the engine. My bikes have always ran great when I start them in the spring. Don't bother starting the bike unless you plan on letting it get good and hot, otherwise you'll just add moisture to the system. Instead, buy a battery tender and keep it plugged in. The battery is really the only think to worry about if it sits and gets cold.
 

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An unused battery that is cold will lose its charge very quickly and force you to totally recharge it in the spring. While there isn't any real danger of the liquid freezing (due to the freezing point depression effect of the acid), a warm battery is happier than a cold one.
 

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An unused battery that is cold will lose its charge very quickly and force you to totally recharge it in the spring. While there isn't any real danger of the liquid freezing (due to the freezing point depression effect of the acid), a warm battery is happier than a cold one.

here's how i thought it worked..... batteries produce electricity by a chemical reaction. for every 10 deg. centigrade increase in temp. reaction rate doubles. so at very cold temps. reaction rate is slower in the battery so it puts out less amperage. if you take that cold battery and warm it up it will return to its ''more powerful'' state. the cold did nothing to shift the amount of molecules ready to take part in the reaction. as a battery becomes more discharged h20, one of the products of the reaction , increases in quanity so the more discharged a battery is the higher temp. its liquid will freeze.lead acid batteries will always eventually discharge over time, no matter what the temp.
all things being equal a battery will be worn out quicker at a higher continuous temp. than at a colder temp. chemical reactions that destroy a battery [like sulfation] also follow the higher temp higher reaction rate rule.
dead batteries where i live freeze and then are usually junk.

these generalizations apply to flooded lead- acid batteries, i don't know how agm or gel batteries respond.
 

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Re batteries: I think the only real danger is that when a lead acid battery discharges, the "lead" comes out of solution as lead sulfate, leaving the solution to be basically water (instead of sulfuric acid), which has a relatively high freezing point of 32F. That means a discharged battery can easily freeze, and since water expands when it freezes, the case of a flooded battery can then crack. (A discharged battery is also susceptible to vibration damage causing the lead flakes to fall off the plates and short in the bottom of the cell.) If you keep your battery charged, it can survive both cold and vibrations very well.

Re tires: you can prevent flat spots in your tires by getting the weight off them... In a pinch, you can also over-inflate them a bit, or as others have said rotate them randomly every month... Ideally you also want them out of the sun while they sit.

Re gas: yup, also as others have said, a full tank and stabilizer (I use sta-bil) works wonders -- just run the bike for a while after adding the stabilizer so it gets into the fuel rail and injectors. I've heard that if you run the bike in winter, you want to get it thoroughly warm before shutting it down to discourage condensation, but that probably depends on the climate (probably not here in Colorado with 15% humidity).
 
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