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I own a 2018 KRT Ninja 400. Stock tires have about 3k on it and probably are fine though almost on the wear marker, for a few more thousand however, I am looking to be ready for when I do hit that point.

I've been looking for tires and it seems to be rather difficult (LEAST for what I feel). I don't want to go to cheap / low on the spectrum and I want a known brand but when I was searching I found my eyes set on Michelin Road 5's / Pilot Road 4's. Except the front tires come only in 120 rather than 110 so I'm out of luck unless I kick up a wider wheel in the front (which if you have an opinion or know if a 120 would fit and if it would be a better tire width, comment about that as well)

I live in new york and i've ridden in the rain multiple times on the stock tires and have been through some heavy rains too, noticing that tire traction is risky to say the least. I rather not ride in the rain but I want a reliable tire that if i do find myself in that situation I'd like to have grip.

So if you have any comments Let me know
Looking for reliability in terms of how many miles I can put on it, how it handles in wet/dry
 

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A silica enhanced compound will give you better grip on wet roads. The Dunlop GPR300 is just a regular compound if I'm not mistaken and I wasn't comfortable with them in the wet. I've ridden with the Continental Sport Attack 3 and they felt a lot better than the GPR300. I have ridden in the rain with these on a twisty highway and through the city. They never lost grip, not like I was riding very hard in these conditions but they felt good. After 9000km they were bald down the center but never squared off. This is my first bike so I can't say if they're better than other tires, they're pretty expensive.

Hard to say how far you can deviate from the stock sizes. The Ninja has 4" rim rear and 3" front. A 120/70 is more appropriate on a 3.5" but will apparently fit 3" rim. Rear seems to be fine with 140/70 or 150/70. you have to check with the tire manufacturer and see what size tire fits your rims. There seems to be a range of what's acceptable.
 

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I don’t know much about bike tires but I was looking at the pirelli diablo rosso III tires when it came time to change and looking like same issue with front tire being 120 back tire they have stock size. If anyone know any info about tires or the ones mentioned in thread please let us know. @Pat @Kiwi Rider
 

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I don’t know much about bike tires but I was looking at the pirelli diablo rosso III tires when it came time to change and looking like same issue with front tire being 120 back tire they have stock size. If anyone know any info about tires or the ones mentioned in thread please let us know. @Pat @Kiwi Rider
You can put a 120 on the front, @emudshit did it, but I dont have any first hand experience of how it changes handling.
It's a bit of a pig and a poke choosing tyres, sometimes you just gotta try out what ever you think is best for your type of riding. Eg. There's no point in myself as a sports rider recommending tyres for commuters.
The Pirelli's you mention are a good tyre though.
If you get it wrong its not for ever, bit like a bad haircut. :smile_big:
 

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It looks like Michelin recently expanded the sizes that the Road 5 is now available in because their website now includes a 110/70-17 and a 150/70-17:

https://motorcycle.michelinman.com/motorbike/tyres/michelin-road-5

I also liked that Avon Spirit ST's are available in our sizes.

https://www.avontyres.com/en-us/tyres/spirit-st?cartype=motorcycle

I had Pilot Road 2's and 4's and Spirits on my previous bike and liked them alot. All three have been good in the rain. And I hope I'm not missing something here, because the availability of Road 5's and Spirits was one of the factors that made me comfortable with buying my Ninjette.
 

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I have run Michelin road 2,3,4’s on my ninja 650. It’s all I would use. Great mileage. Treads water very well. The way I ride my 400, I don’t think I would like the rounded tire profile. I think I am going to stay with a more sport based tire on this bike. But if I rode it to work like I used to I’d likely run the pilot roads again due to extended mileage and safety commuting in the rain.
 

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The NewGen 250, 300, and Gen2 500 all use similar size tires. The 250 guys really like the Diablo Rosso II as a performance tire, but it has a pretty short life. I assume the DR3 is an improved version, but I haven't actually checked out the details. (The PreGen guys also like the Diablo Scooter tires for their 16" wheels.) The Michelin Pilot Street Radial is highly rated for pretty good performance combined with insane durability. One guy who had his DR2 down to the cords within 3,000mi found that the PSR looked brand new at 3k, while still performing quite well. A lot of people get ~10k out of them. When I upgraded the wheels on my 500 (to the same size tire as the 400), I went with Michelin Pilot Powers. I was very happy with them, as I wasn't looking for a ton of durability with my limited riding season up here. My bike is my pleasure toy, so I don't generally ride in bad weather, so I can't comment on how well they work there.

Keep in mind how much you ride. Tires age over time (in addition to just mileage) and get hard. If you only ride 1,000mi a year, there's no sense in getting tires that will last 10,000mi. They'll be in bad shape and need replacing long before you wear out the tread. Might as well get some better performing, less durable tires in that case. On the other hand, if you ride 10,000mi a year, changing tires every 2k might get annoying.

Going to a 120 front on the little Ninjas is fairly common. The wider tire tends to make the steering a bit slower, but it's nothing too horrible. Just a little difference to get used to.
 

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I just installed these on my Ninja400 after 7600 miles of original tires

Michelin Road 5
Front Tire Size: 110/70ZR17
Tire Size: 150/60ZR17

along with new Kawasaki brake pads.
 

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It looks like Michelin recently expanded the sizes that the Road 5 is now available in because their website now includes a 110/70-17 and a 150/70-17:

https://motorcycle.michelinman.com/motorbike/tyres/michelin-road-5

I also liked that Avon Spirit ST's are available in our sizes.

https://www.avontyres.com/en-us/tyres/spirit-st?cartype=motorcycle

I had Pilot Road 2's and 4's and Spirits on my previous bike and liked them alot. All three have been good in the rain. And I hope I'm not missing something here, because the availability of Road 5's and Spirits was one of the factors that made me comfortable with buying my Ninjette.
I just noticed I made a mistake when I was researching the stock tire sizes and my post was incorrect, our stock rear tire is 150/60-17, not 150/70-17 as I stated above. :confused:

This means that the Michelin Road 5 is available in our stock sizes, but the Avon Spirit ST's do not come in our rear stock size. Sorry if I confused anyone.
 

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I'm horrible at trying to visualize anything through the fog that's normally floating around in my mind. This link allows me to type in tire sizes, and offers a side-by-side visual and specs on the 2 tires compared. It also shows how the different sized tire will effect the speedometer.
https://tiresize.com/comparison/
 

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I just installed these on my Ninja400 after 7600 miles of original tires

Michelin Road 5
Front Tire Size: 110/70ZR17
Tire Size: 150/60ZR17

along with new Kawasaki brake pads.
Did you have to change air pressure when you changed the tires? I did the same and it felt sluggish.
 

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I can recommend Bridgestone s22 tires for a grip upgrade. The bundled gpr300 tires are pretty good as oem goes, but squirmy hanging off at harder lean angles which I wasn't used to. It's funny because the gpr300's feel like a rather soft compound to the fingernail which is reflected in the shorter life, but the grip didn't entirely correspond to my feeling at least.
I got 6,500km out of the rear with the front still serviceable, but replaced as a set.
 
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