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Value Check for Ninja 400 as First Bike

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I'm going to check out a 2020 Ninja 400 ABS this week. It has 11,000 miles, and was wondering if this is a good price, as I haven't seen any others for sale with mileage that high.
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I'm going to check out a 2020 Ninja 400 ABS this week. It has 11,000 miles, and was wondering if this is a good price, as I haven't seen any others for sale with mileage that high.
What would the price be that you are wondering is fair? 馃榿
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What would the price be that you are wondering is fair? 馃榿
Honestly haven't looked at bikes in a long time, so I don't know. Main thing is I'm unfamiliar with how 5,000 vs 11,000 miles affects value. If it doesn't affect much, then $4k is good, if it affects it, then $3500-$3750.
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Honestly haven't looked at bikes in a long time, so I don't know. Main thing is I'm unfamiliar with how 5,000 vs 11,000 miles affects value. If it doesn't affect much, then $4k is good, if it affects it, then $3500-$3750.
It sort of depends on your area, but those numbers seem high for a bike with 11k miles.
In So Cal, I paid $4k for a 400 with 6k miles in 2020. Granted I got a pretty decent deal. I would definitely pay $4k for a 400 with 11k miles as well. If it looks good, the owner is responsible and has some sort of service records/proof, I'd go with it.
I definitely prefer a vehicle with a bit higher mileage that was meticulously maintained over a lower mileage random one. My general rule for bikes is 3-5k miles per year is good purely from a mileage perspective. Some people put 10k miles a year and maintain it well. Some may have only 2k miles but never did the first oil change, floors it on a cold engine, jammed gear shifts, etc. Too many variables to go off mileage alone.
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If possible take someone more experienced with bikes to check it out and get their input. Or take a lot of pics and send it to someone or post here, I am sure you would get feedback.
Im taki
If possible take someone more experienced with bikes to check it out and get their input. Or take a lot of pics and send it to someone or post here, I am sure you would get feedback.
Ng a buddy, but I'm not sure how mechanically inclined he is. I should be able to go take pictures before buying. Thanks
Im taki

Ng a buddy, but I'm not sure how mechanically inclined he is. I should be able to go take pictures before buying. Thanks
This is my old pre-ride bike checklist. I haven't had a chance to really update it or make it pretty. I made this about 4 years ago. So maybe it'll provide you with some of the things to check. Your friend could probably find a better list online. I have other things I check out whilst examining, and also can tell a few other things during the test ride. But dont have the time to re-review

Electrical wires (any chewing or other obvious wear) + working lights (headlights, highbeam, turn signals) & horn
Chain (dirty, slack, tight spots, can you pull off rear sprocket edge, side sway)
Sprockets teeth and overall condition
engine oil (how dirty, the level, any condensation/milkyness)
Fuel tank (dirty, rust, etc.)
hoses and anything rubber (cracking, dried out, etc)
Fork Seals, Forks, Shock (cracked/dried, leaks, excessive pogo'ing)
Tires (wear, ratio, type, age, dry rot, etc.)
Title/Registration
Tool kit
Trunk and seat removes easily
Owner Manual
Coolant (level + color)
brake fluid (level + color)
levers/pegs (any bending)
missing bolts/screws
throttle return
check for any scratches/cracks on the fairings, fender, exhaust, levers, bent rims, etc.
before and after ride, check for leaks (if they are trying to cover something up by wiping it off, it should reappear after the ride)
leave the bike on while you do the pre ride check. On but engine not started. Take your sweet ass time checking the bike out. If the battery is going out, the bike being on the on position with screen lit up might sap enough voltage from the battery that it wont start. When you bring the bike back, cut the engine but leave all the lights on again. Do another review of the bike and try starting again.
Edit: of course check all nooks and crannies for rust.

amount of keys available

confirm if ABS or not. test if working by stomping rear in low speed to see how/if locks up

Questions to ask (also take note of their tone and how they answer, in addition to what they answer with [which could be poppycock]):
*leave the bike cold for you (some issues kind of get muted when warmed up)
*main purpose used, commute detail
*reason for selling
*maintenance schedule/records
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Along with the checklist above, ask what type of riding the current owner did...wear and tear on a 400 will be higher on a one that was taken often to a track -- and the N400 is a popular track bike, so it bears the question -- than one that was used as a commuter. The mileage is higher than what you'd normally expect, so it clearly wasn't just a weekend toy...find out what that form that other usage came in. That said, my guess is that if it was a track bike that it'll have mods that will visually suggest that immediately...or not, and/or he could have replaced the stock parts before sale. Honestly, unless it's a helluva deal, I'd recommend waiting for a lower mileage example...the N400 is a common first bike, so low-mileage examples are (in a normal buyer's market, anyhow) are relatively common from first-time riders who either upgrade quickly or decide motorcycling isn't for them after all.
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