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Wow, those 2.0 versions look great...hmmmmm
Yeah I really like the design and think it fits perfectly with the overall theme of the Ninja 400.
 

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I've just installed the Arashi 2.0 rearsets. Quick measurements are they are approx 30mm higher and 70mm further rearward over stock when using the most forward highest holes. All the rearset hole options must be used with the holes that line up vertically, nothing diagonal which is seriously unfortunate as that would massively boost height options and have made my install easier by avoiding clearance issues. This means that even at the rear most setting, they will still only be 30mm higher than standard, and about 85mm further rearward. 70mm shift rearward was already a bunch and I'd happily have compromised on that to get more height. If there was a height benefit to shifting them further back then I probably would have, otherwise not much point.

This was a lot of fluffing around getting everything to work how I liked it.

The main problem I had was running GP shift with my significantly-lower-than-most-people preference for gear shifter height due to an old ankle injury. The shift rod and knuckle at the shifter end interfere with the peg bracket. What really aggravated me was that if any of the bracket mounting holes could be used diagonally e.g. first mounting the rearset to any lower hole option, and tilting it forward to an upper hole, rather than the hole directly vertical. This would have tilted the peg bracket enough that there would be no clearance issues. The rearset mount is cut away at an angle at that problem point, so clearly they are kinda aware of the issue, but it's insufficient. So I ended up grinding the bracket and knuckle with my rotary tool. There's still contact, but it doesn't seem to be a problem. The 'plus' side with my lower gear shifter preference is the heel guard can mount normally vs opposite side of the bracket, as the shift knuckle doesn't hit it, not that it's a big deal.

Second problem that's been mentioned already in this thread is the shift rod is about 20mm too long if using the forward holes (at least in gp shift). If using the rearward holes then the additional length is usable. Lopping some thread off each end of the shift rod with the rotary tool sorted that. It's still about 10mm too long for my config if going for the theoretical ideal right-angle to the gear shaft.

On the brake side it's correct that the master cylinder can be maneuvered around without replacing the abs brake line. You do need to pull through some slack on the brake switch cable, but no problem there.
After a ridiculous amount of faffing around trying to get the brake light to work properly (using those forward highest holes), I rotated their brake switch bracket 180 degrees to the highest point. While this wasn't their design intention, because the switch now interferes slightly with the master cylinder, the pull angle is now sane and works 100% reliably. So glad, but lots of grumbling getting there. The problem was their standard position interfered with the rearset bracket so it forced the brake switch to point diagonally rearward while the brake pedal had a terrible angle to try and pull it with very limited range of movement. It was hopeless with the stock set up. If using the rearward rearset mount holes this probably won't be an issue.
Somehow during all this, while screwing the peg bracket on for the 100th time, some sparks flashed over the bolt. I had the key on while trying to get the rear brake to activate the brake light, but everything looked insulated around the brake switch. Anyway it blew the brake light fuse. Nice of them to have a spare fuse in there. I can only assume my profuse sweating conducted something down the brake light switch shaft.

Anyway all now installed and seems fine, but I've really had my fill of rearset bits mounting, unmounting, adjusting, rinse repeat. Glad it's finished. Note that install would be easier with standard shift pattern and not have such a low gear shift lever preference.

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Thanks for the great write up. Those are good looking rearsets. Let us know your thoughts after you put a few miles on them.
 

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Discussion Starter #66
Nice write up and comprehensive photos. Yeah I've fitted a few sets of rear sets now, I know a lot of the conundrums you speak of. It does pay to be a reasonably experienced tinkerer with access to a good workshop set up when fitting these things. There's always small issues to work around...
They look good though and the price is right. :)
 

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Yeah this was the first set of rearsets I've fitted and I thought it'd be more plug and play. Nevertheless the price was certainly right, and, just having been for a good ride with them on, I'm very pleased with them. Worth the effort.

Somehow the shifting feels like it has improved. I've got the shift peg slid back a bit, rather than at the very end of the lever, which certainly gives a shorter throw. Feels very snick snick.

I've noticed my boots being so far further back just slightly foul on the pillion pegs, so the pillion peg brackets will have to come off. No biggy as I basically never have a pillion. The exhaust hanger pillion peg bracket will have to stay on until I find another muffler hanger.

The red brake lever height adjustment disk will also have to go as even at the highest setting the brake lever is very low. With it removed the lever can be adjusted higher but will soundly block a mounting bolt. Not a major as hardly something I plan on removing.
 

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Another thing I've noticed is the Arashi heel guards aren't so much heel guards as toe guards. Not much of an issue on the gear shift side, but I've taken a leaf from Woodcraft's book and am using the stock heel guard on the brake side as this actually blocks my heel from climbing over the rear master cylinder. Asthetics can take a back seat.

The Arashi heel guards look like a boot snagging liability generally, but haven't been a problem so far.

The black finish on the pegs is wearing in places to reveal silver. Probably not helped by the now exposed and worn metal screws that hold a removable sole in my Sidi boots.
 

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I've got to bring this topic back to life for a report out on how the Arashi are holding up. I purchased the Vortex for my bike and my son wants to upgrade from stock but does not have the $ sitting around for the Vortex or Woodcraft prices. I've read the thread and like what I see with the Chinese set but question replacement parts and durability.
These will be on a track only bike and will more than likely be stress tested by boot and pavement.
 

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After having to replace parts a couple times now, I would say he’s likely better off saving some cash for Woodcraft, especially on a track bike that is likely to stress tested as you say. You can buy pretty much every single piece that comprises them as replacement parts, listed individually, rather than having to buy another set of rearsets when things go horribly wrong. The spares are pretty reasonably priced and ship fast too.
 

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Overall I'm very happy with my Arashi's and have had no failures yet. The only thing I've noticed is the odd occasion I'm zapping a short distance wearing shoes is that occasionally the shoe lace loop can hook over the left rearset heel guard. I'm running the factory heel guard on the right hand side so no problem there.
More rarely I have had my left Sidi Vortice boot catch in the same area. The Vortice has a plastic strap that tightens down mid foot that has snagged the same left heel guard. It has only happened a couple of times, but it does make want to sort out some replacement. Unfortunately the bolt pattern differs from the stock guards.
 

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Discussion Starter #73 (Edited)
I've got to bring this topic back to life for a report out on how the Arashi are holding up. I purchased the Vortex for my bike and my son wants to upgrade from stock but does not have the $ sitting around for the Vortex or Woodcraft prices. I've read the thread and like what I see with the Chinese set but question replacement parts and durability.
These will be on a track only bike and will more than likely be stress tested by boot and pavement.
The Arashi's are quite popular down this part of the world probably because with the exchange rate and shipping etc the likes of Woodcraft and Vortex work out really expensive. I consider them to be the pic of the Chinese stuff. I've not long bought another set and fitted them to my new SV race bike last weekend. I wouldn't be fitting them if they were junk. ;)
Postage can be slow though if your in a hurry for them.
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The Arashi's are quite popular down this part of the world probably because with the exchange rate and shipping etc the likes of Woodcraft and Vortex work out really expensive. I consider them to be the pic of the Chinese stuff. I've not long bought another set and fitted them to my new SV race bike last weekend. I wouldn't be fitting them if they were junk. ;)
Postage can be slow though if your in a hurry for them.
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Thank you for the report, this seems to be the case here in the states too. I think he is going to order a set and give them a whirl, are the replacement parts available on eBay? I could not find them.
 

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After having to replace parts a couple times now, I would say he’s likely better off saving some cash for Woodcraft, especially on a track bike that is likely to stress tested as you say. You can buy pretty much every single piece that comprises them as replacement parts, listed individually, rather than having to buy another set of rearsets when things go horribly wrong. The spares are pretty reasonably priced and ship fast too.
Where are you finding the spares and when they are stress tested what seems to break the most often?
 

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The spares are sold directly, I’ve replaced bar end slider pucks on both sides, left clip-on bar, right side brake lever peg, and the right side foot peg. I’m not yet sure if my right bar is straight after the lowside (the clip-on riser rotated a little on the fork tube) but I bought one anyway; at $15, it will be good to have a spare if I don’t need to install it now.

Both times I’ve ordered replacement parts, they’ve been on their way in less than 24 hours.
 

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Discussion Starter #77
Thank you for the report, this seems to be the case here in the states too. I think he is going to order a set and give them a whirl, are the replacement parts available on eBay? I could not find them.
I haven't had to require any parts for them so not sure, haven't searched. It wouldnt surprise me if they dont sell individual parts. As a back up for my current race bike I have a full set of brand new rear sets in my spares box that I take to the track. They are just cheapies that cost me $99 AUD with free freight but would get me through a race weekend. I would probably pay that for one woodcraft foot peg down this part of the world lol.
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I haven't had to require any parts for them so not sure, haven't searched. It wouldnt surprise me if they dont sell individual parts. As a back up for my current race bike I have a full set of brand new rear sets in my spares box that I take to the track. They are just cheapies that cost me $99 AUD with free freight but would get me through a race weekend. I would probably pay that for one woodcraft foot peg down this part of the world lol.
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Probably a good route to go by just ordering two sets, still cheaper than one set of the name brand. Thank you!!
 

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Anodizing Rear sets

I went with the Anodizing rear sets for 60 bucks(EBay). My expectations were low and after 6 track days on them, I am happy to report they fit awesome and have held up fine. My friend brought the exact same set from Amazon and he is happy with them as well. The instructions were horrible, I found a Utube video of a guy putting on the same set on his 400. The brake side was a pain, I had to get a different spring from Lowe’s. The one that came with the set is too thick. My friend had a shop put his on and they didn’t use the supplied spring either. I set mines up with GP SHIFT and zero issues. My friends is standard. Awesome bang for the buck!

I wanted the Arashi ones, they look awesome with the touch of red. But when I emailed the seller if they could be set up for GP SHIFT he wasn’t sure. Looking at Boats I am sure they could be, oh well.
your pipe looks so clean, I have some stain or burn marks caused sometimes I step my heel on it, I tried wd-40 but didn't work, do you have any idea how to clean it? thank you so much
 

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So Arashi definitely saved money on the brake switch spring and bracket, because mine have a lot of surface rust. They haven't seen much wet weather either.
Everything else is looks fine.

I've now doused them in long life anti rust.

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