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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I consulted the service manual and it says that you have to remove the rotation sensor, caliper, and the right hand axle nut with the cotter pin before the wheel can be changed out. I don't see why you couldn't just remove the axle nut on the left side and pull out the axle from the right then slide the wheel straight out without messing with the calipers and all that. Am I missing something or is the manual overcomplicating things?
 

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You can do exactly that but the caliper will “fall” and hang by the hydro line. No bid deal. I like to zip tie it in place before removing the wheel. Dont do it super tight. Just hold it there and alow some movement so when you put the wheel back on you can work the disc back into the pads with that alight movement.

Oh yAh
There is chain too🤣. Just hang it ip on the swing arm.
 

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Check chain adjustment after

keep the bearings clean. Grease the axle. Don’t over tighten the axle nut. It’s better to turn it back or loose to make the cotter pin fit then to over tighten it

the manual is still good to follow. So do that
 

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2021 Ninja 400, 1998 Honda VTR1000 SuperHawk
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I keep the axle as it was designed by Kawasaki and when I do remove the rear wheel, I pull the axle all the way out and use an 11mm deep well socket to keep the rear caliper from falling off. 😉

Reinstallation has the nut on the right side and I always torque to spec. 🙏

Captive spacers are a godsend for ease of reinstallation so if you're removing the wheel as much as I do for cleaning etc they make life much easier. 👍
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes you are missing some things. If you try doing it as you described you will learn why they need to come off. I would reinstall the axle from the right side to make torquing the nut easier-no exhaust on that side to get in the way.
This guy makes it look really easy but I trust that the manual has the right procedure. Is there any trick to doing it without captive spacers? I should probably just drop the cash but I've got a flat and the new tires arrived yesterday so I'm not keen to wait on another shipment.
 

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Captive spacers and captive adjusters that hold the sliding blocks in place are huge improvements. As is inserting the axel from the right and not pulling it all the way out so it holds the caliper bracket in place. Pinning the axel with a roll pin so it doesn’t spin makes holding that skinny little hex end while tightening the nut unnecessary. The final touch is to bevel the back end of the brake pads so they forms a guide for stabbing the rotor back into the caliper.
 

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Captive spacers....
I thought it was pretty straightforward 🤷🏼‍♂️
Wheel come offy and go back ony..... backwards of how it came offy.

🤣🤣

i learn things well by just taking them apart slowly and learning how the things work/what they are doing.
Just take your time and understand what is going on.

and it dosnt hurt to take pics of every step if you want. That will boost your confidence on first time part removal
 

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I thought you'd done less than 400mi?
How many times have you removed the rear wheel 😆?
360 miles to be exact. 🤫😉
I've probably removed the rear wheel about a half a dozen times for cleaning and rear suspension work during the building process. 😁
Same with the front. 🤪
 

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This guy makes it look really easy but I trust that the manual has the right procedure. Is there any trick to doing it without captive spacers? I should probably just drop the cash but I've got a flat and the new tires arrived yesterday so I'm not keen to wait on another shipment.
The reason that looks so easy is the little jack under the tire(I forget what it is called), and captive spacers.
Otherwise it is your foot or a 2x4 trying to hold the tire up, and knocking spacers out as you try to put the tire into place.
It can be done fairly easily, but it was a pain for me the first couple of times.
 

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If you’re not at a track how quick you do it doesn’t matter but putting everything back properly is important. This bike isn’t bad because the wheels are light etc but some larger bikes with wider wheels and dual disc brakes don’t just slip in and out. If it’s your first time just go slow and check everything and I am sure you can do it because it isn’t really that hard.
 

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360 miles to be exact. 🤫😉
I've probably removed the rear wheel about a half a dozen times for cleaning and rear suspension work during the building process. 😁
Same with the front. 🤪
Holy crap, 360 miles is a long day ride for me.
You need to quit working on that bike, and ride it.
It isn't a museum piece.
Isn't there somewhere in that rig you drive to bring it with you on those long hauls?
 

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This guy makes it look really easy but I trust that the manual has the right procedure. Is there any trick to doing it without captive spacers? I should probably just drop the cash but I've got a flat and the new tires arrived yesterday so I'm not keen to wait on another shipment.
I was about to link this video on here but I see someone else already did it for me lol That is me in the video and my bike. Flipping your axle the other way and using it to hold the caliper in place helps. Captive spacers are a HUGE help too. A pitbull tire wedge is also very helpful. The manual's procedure is obviously not wrong, but it's also not the quickest. If your setup is totally stock, it's a bit of a struggle because the stock spacers constantly fall off as soon as you accidently hit them on the swing arm, and likewise with the chain adjusters.
 
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