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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys just wondering is this okay? So I got my brake pads down low and the dealer replaced them but said i was super close from destryong them. Are they suppose to look like this? Thanks
 

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Hey guys just wondering is this okay? So I got my brake pads down low and the dealer replaced them but said i was super close from destryong them. Are they suppose to look like this? Thanks
Wow how'd you get the scorch marks - Looks like rapid oxidation has been going on a while from the photo, Is your foot riding the breaks..? are you doing track days or racing...?
Are you using the rear break to do all your slowing - zero engine breaking...? I could be off a bit but I think your rotor has gone cherry, way over heated to have that red tint I see in the photo.

Both of mine are still shinny and are new looking, as are the ones on my Ninja 250 with 27k miles on it. One of the racer guys will know the answer I bet - whether or not the rotor is likely to shatter.
 

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Dragging rear brake that just looks like caked on brake dust. If it's within thickness tolerance probably fine.
 

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Hey guys just wondering is this okay? So I got my brake pads down low and the dealer replaced them but said i was super close from destryong them. Are they suppose to look like this? Thanks
No. They are not supposed to look like that. They should look shiny when new, slightly threaded when used, and deeply threaded when need replacement.
You may actually got some damaged on the disc for going too low on the pads. But if the dealer looked at it and say it was ok with just a pads replacement, then you should be ok.

If you feel the bike brakes the same or almost the same as before and there is no noise when braking, then you're good.


It's weird you got the rear brake so worn so soon. How many miles on your bike?
You should be braking more with the front brake. It has more power, and it's the 'right' brake to use.

Also check that you're not riding with your foot on the rear brake lever. As someone said above, you may be dragging the rear brake.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
No. They are not supposed to look like that. They should look shiny when new, slightly threaded when used, and deeply threaded when need replacement.
You may actually got some damaged on the disc for going too low on the pads. But if the dealer looked at it and say it was ok with just a pads replacement, then you should be ok.

If you feel the bike brakes the same or almost the same as before and there is no noise when braking, then you're good.


It's weird you got the rear brake so worn so soon. How many miles on your bike?
You should be braking more with the front brake. It has more power, and it's the 'right' brake to use.

Also check that you're not riding with your foot on the rear brake lever. As someone said above, you may be dragging the rear brake.
I have 2400miles on it do you think I need to replace it?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Wow how'd you get the scorch marks - Looks like rapid oxidation has been going on a while from the photo, Is your foot riding the breaks..? are you doing track days or racing...?
Are you using the rear break to do all your slowing - zero engine breaking...? I could be off a bit but I think your rotor has gone cherry, way over heated to have that red tint I see in the photo.

Both of mine are still shinny and are new looking, as are the ones on my Ninja 250 with 27k miles on it. One of the racer guys will know the answer I bet - whether or not the rotor is likely to shatter.
I use engine braking all the time very well and use both brakes evenly and do not track it so what do you think I should do
 

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I have 2400miles on it do you think I need to replace it?
If the rear brake brakes decently and it doesn't make any noise, then I wouldn't replace the rotor.
It's hard to tell from a picture.
You can also check the thickness of the rotor. Get a caliper, measure the rotor, and check the measure with the service manual. The service manual will tell you the minimum thickness that the rotor has to have. If thinner than that, then replace it.

If the dealer looked at it and said it was ok, then it should be ok. And also the dealer must be a honest one. They usually try to service your bike more than needed.


If your rear pads got worn at 2400 miles, then you must be heavily braking with the rear. Not a bad thing for street riding as long as you leave enough space with the vehicles in front of you. But hard braking should always be done with the front brake. The rear tire will start skidding way sooner than the front on a hard brake.

Put the bike on a rear stand and check that the rear wheels spins freely.

Keep a close look at the rear pads (and the front as well for that matter).
Learn how to check the pads and how to replace them. It's easy and no need of special tools.

Another tip for braking: Always keep your index and middle finger on the brake lever, and wrap the throttle with the ring and pinky fingers. That way, you're always ready to do an emergency brake.
My index and middle fingers are never on the throttle body.
 

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If the rear brake brakes decently and it doesn't make any noise, then I wouldn't replace the rotor.
It's hard to tell from a picture.
You can also check the thickness of the rotor. Get a caliper, measure the rotor, and check the measure with the service manual. The service manual will tell you the minimum thickness that the rotor has to have. If thinner than that, then replace it.

If the dealer looked at it and said it was ok, then it should be ok. And also the dealer must be a honest one. They usually try to service your bike more than needed.


If your rear pads got worn at 2400 miles, then you must be heavily braking with the rear. Not a bad thing for street riding as long as you leave enough space with the vehicles in front of you. But hard braking should always be done with the front brake. The rear tire will start skidding way sooner than the front on a hard brake.

Put the bike on a rear stand and check that the rear wheels spins freely.

Keep a close look at the rear pads (and the front as well for that matter).
Learn how to check the pads and how to replace them. It's easy and no need of special tools.

Another tip for braking: Always keep your index and middle finger on the brake lever, and wrap the throttle with the ring and pinky fingers. That way, you're always ready to do an emergency brake.
My index and middle fingers are never on the throttle body.
Oh yeah, I learned this the hard way. It was my first spill, being ham -fisted on the front brakes. Luckily it happened at the MSF course, few years ago. I locked the front wheel at speed and whoopsie daisy! thank you Bosch for ABS.

@ A1Digst, you say the tech replaced the pads, but did he service the caliper?.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Oh yeah, I learned this the hard way. It was my first spill, being ham -fisted on the front brakes. Luckily it happened at the MSF course, few years ago. I locked the front wheel at speed and whoopsie daisy! thank you Bosch for ABS.

@ A1Digst, you say the tech replaced the pads, but did he service the caliper?.
I have no idea I just know I got new brake pads and new brake fluid
 

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If you've got new pads and it spins OK on the rear stand and rear brake action works well using your hand on the pedal then just carry on as you were.
If its dragging you will hear it and feel how hard it is to spin wheel..
When your spinning the wheel on the stand just run your eye over the rotor from the rear of the bike to check it's not warped/buckled from over-heating, unlikely.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
If you've got new pads and it spins OK on the rear stand and rear brake action works well using your hand on the pedal then just carry on as you were.
If its dragging you will hear it and feel how hard it is to spin wheel..
When your spinning the wheel on the stand just run your eye over the rotor from the rear of the bike to check it's not warped/buckled from over-heating, unlikely.
I do not have a stand what would you do in my situation?
 

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I would have sanded that rotor until it looked consistent across it's surface and removed as much of that foreign substance before those new pads went on.


At this point I would now remove the pads AND the rotor and sand them both to a consistent surface. Use a power sander if necessary. That material left on the rotor will transfer to the new pads and perpetuate the problem.
 

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I do not have a stand what would you do in my situation?
Invest in one! :)
Put a small trolley jack or even a scissor jack out of your car under the bottom of the rear shock and take the weight onto the side stand so the rear wheel just leaves the ground. Probably best to get someone to hold bike steady while you spin wheel as this set up can be a bit wobbly and precarious!

I would have sanded that rotor until it looked consistent across it's surface and removed as much of that foreign substance before those new pads went on.
At this point I would now remove the pads AND the rotor and sand them both to a consistent surface. Use a power sander if necessary. That material left on the rotor will transfer to the new pads and perpetuate the problem.
It just looks superficial, even a rub with scotch brite (do you guys have that?) or some sort of scouring pad while wheel is still on bike should be enough. It doesn't look like the disc is actually gouged, grooved or worn.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Invest in one! :)
Put a small trolley jack or even a scissor jack out of your car under the bottom of the rear shock and take the weight onto the side stand so the rear wheel just leaves the ground. Probably best to get someone to hold bike steady while you spin wheel as this set up can be a bit wobbly and precarious!



It just looks superficial, even a rub with scotch brite (do you guys have that?) or some sort of scouring pad while wheel is still on bike should be enough. It doesn't look like the disc is actually gouged, grooved or worn.
Thanks will do tommrow!!! What are your thoughts from the picture though?
 

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Here is my rear brake disk at about 2K. I slightly drag it but do most braking with the front brake. Maybe your discolored rotor will smooth out with the new pads but still wondering how it got worn so fast. What ever happened, I think your rear brake will be fine from now on.
14995
 
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