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2021 Ninja 400 ABS
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
++++++UPDATED: 05/04/2021 - pics added++++++
I thought I would do, what may be helpful for some, a rating of the mods I have done to my Ninja 400. This can help people who are looking at the perspective mods and deciding whether or not they are worth it or beneficial.

I will put my former mods on the first post, then my oldest mods on the second post, and finally my newest mods on the third post, then rate them all. Former mods were mods I deemed not good enough, or decided to go another route with.

I will put a little insight, what it is, the price, and the rating. While your mileage may vary and your opinion differ, I thought this would be helpful to some.

Rating guide:
0 = Dangerous, use at your own risk!
1-4 = I found it a waste of money, non-functional, or a bad value.
5 = Decent, but not exceptional
6-7 = Good mod
8-9 = Highly recommended mod
10 = No brainer mod, best of the best


By all means, feel free to comment, ask questions, or share your own mods and rating. Just please keep the 0-10 scale with 10 being best/essential and 0 being a waste of money and time, or dangerous modification.

Without further ado, let me get into it.

Former Mods:

Brand: Two Brothers
Model: Hurricane exhaust
What it is: Slip-on exhaust for the Ninja 400
Cost: $350-380
Rating: 6 out of 10
Value: 4 out of 10
Ease of Install: 9 out of 10
Requires: Remove factory silencer, replace with this unit. Done.


The Two Brothers Hurricane slip on looks decent, but I found the exhaust profile way too small for even the Ninja 400. It sounds good, with a nice throaty exhaust note, and it was easy to install. While I did not feel much of a performance improvement and never dynoed it, I did like the sound but the look was a bit puny.

I just feel it is too expensive for what it is, another bummer was it did not come with the "retro skull logo" badge it is advertised as coming with, rather a generic Two Brothers badge that I did not even bother using. The included hardware is high quality, but you can get a better exhaust for not much more money (like the Akrapovic).

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Brand: Homemade, likely (eBay)
Model: Oxygen sensor eliminator kit (o2 eliminator)
What it is: Puts the Ninja 400 in closed loop mode, tricks it into thinking the o2 sensor is still installed so no engine codes, prevents the ECU from modifying the air/fuel ratio
Cost: $15-30
Rating: 1 out of 10 (but read the description)
Value: 10 out of 10 for the intended use and it is cheap!
Ease of install: 7 out of 10
Requires: remove left (exhaust side) fairings, upper, lower, and large mid. Remove factory o2 sensor, use the included cap in its place. Plug the circuit plug where the o2 sensor plugged in. Reinstall everything.


This mod is tricky to rate, because while it does do exactly what it says it does, it is not a performance mod! This made my Ninja 400 run extremely rich, no matter which Power Commander V map I used. I also noticed a lot more pops coming from the exhaust and you can smell how rich the N400 was running.

Yet, this does have a good use, if you are doing a dyno test of your motorcycle, this is the intended use for it. It gives a better, more consistent reading for the dyno tuning/tuner, because then the o2 sensor is not adjusting the fuel table. It does not work for performance increases because the closed loop mode does not allow the ECU to adjust the fuel tables and it will usually run rich with it installed.

They used to include these with the Power Commanders, but likely stopped including them when people were using them to bypass the o2 sensor on a more permanent basis. Then, the same people were wondering why they were not running right or too rich, complaining about it. This would be useful if using the Autotune module. But I removed it and my Ninja 400 is running better with the o2 sensor installed, because the claim you gain performance with it are completely unfounded.

Brand: TechSpec
Model: Snakeskin Tank Grips
What it is: Allows you to better grip the fuel tank with your knees
Cost: $60.00
Rating: 4 out of 10 (down from 6 out of 10 now)
Value: 5 out of 10 (down from 6 out of 10 now)
Ease Of Install: 10 out of 10
Requires: Clean the tank, peel the backing, line up, stick to the gas tank. Done.


While an easy mod to install, it is very expensive for what it is and I actually removed it now. (04/30/2021)

Here is the major bummer: for some reason, the back and right side tank grip left a nasty, smelly residue on my tank in big patches (reminds me of the resin on the back of credit cards that attach them to the paper)! It took me rubbing alcohol and about 30 minutes of scrubbing to get it all off of my gas tank, which made me very unhappy, plus dropped the rating and value I originally gave this mod. Goes on easy as can be (but not as easy to line up), but a half hour or scraping residue off was not what I expected!

While it does what it says and could be very useful for track days and such, this is no longer a mod I will use or recommend for the majority of Ninja 400 or Z400 owners. $60.00 down the drain for me and before I removed it, it was bubbling up on the one side for some reason (but the only side that did not leave residue).

A simple Progrip tank pad is now in its place and I like the look much better and prefer the Progrip much more compared to the generic looks of the TechSpec "triangular" generic pad.

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(Next Post: My Older Mods)
 

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2021 Ninja 400 ABS
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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
++++++UPDATED: 05/04/2021 - Pics added++++++
My Older Mods:

Brand: RanSoto
Model: Fender Eliminator Kit
What it is: Also known as a tail tidy, it does away with the ugly plastic rear fender and relocates the lights and license plate bracket.
Cost: $38.00
Rating: 10 out of 10
Value: 10 out of 10
Ease Of Install: 7 out of 10
Requires: Removing and disconnecting factory tail fender and wiring, removing the rear seat pillion. Taking the factory license plate light and rear turn signals and hooking them up to the new unit. Rewiring the license plate and turn signal lights, installing this in place of the factory rear fender. Attach license plate to it.


This is what I consider a must-do mod for basically any sport bike, the Ninja 400 included! Not only does this make the motorcycle look a lot better, with the rear fender usually ugly on the stock bikes, but it saves a little weight as well. This one was inexpensive and uses your stock rear turn signals. they are not super easy to remove and install, and it took me a bit to get them in there, but the end result is worth it. There are many other brands and versions of this, yet the RanSoto kit is surprisingly nice and the cost was great on it. I think it looks and the quality of the materials is just as high as some of the more expensive ones. Great buy and has held up without any issues!

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Brand: Shogun
Model: Complete No-cut frame slider kit
What it is: Protects your fairings, levers, motor, covers, spool arms, and other expensive components from damage in case of a tip-over or crash
Rating: 10 out of 10
Value: 10 out of 10
Ease Of Install: 6 out of 10
Requires: Removing the seat, passenger seat, the fairings on both sides (under front, upper, lower, and mid fairings on the left and right side). Disconnecting the turn signals, and the fuse boxes on the left side of the motorcycle. Unbolting the engine studs (one at a time), installing side no-cut slider, then the opposite side. Taking off the factory left and right bar end sliders and installing the included ones, and installing the spool arm sliders (all to correct torque specs). Reinstalling everything.


Another no-brainer mod that makes sense and provides a decent degree of protection to your fairings and other equipment on your motorcycle. With factory fairings costing $1000+, sometimes not even including paint, protecting those alone are worth it. These are fairly simple to install, provide protection to essentially your entire motorcycle component list. I would not own a sport bike without these installed, as an added plus the spool arm sliders allow you to use paddock stands.

Brand: No name (simply says "Ninja 400" in white letters) from Amazon
Model: Radiator Grill Guard Cover
What it is: Protects your radiator from flying rocks and debris
Cost: $40.00
Rating: 9 out of 10
Value: 10 out of 10
Ease Of Install: 10 out of 10
Requires: Put in place, screw included screws in and tighten, done


Easy to install and protects your radiator from rocks and debris, what is not to like? While not "essential", for piece of mind and for the cost of having one as opposed to having to drain coolant and change a radiator (not cheap!), it is another simple but effective modification. It weighs basically nothing and is a great mod. Has a pretty cool honeycomb pattern and looks OEM, and installs with 4 screws/nuts. Easier to install with the fairings removed, I did mine while I installed the Shogun frame sliders.

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Brand: Progrip
Model:Tank Pad
What it is: Protects the back of your fuel tank from the zipper of your riding jacket, looks good, provides grip for you when against the tank.
Cost: $24.00 (there are cheaper, more expensive, and other brands and types)
Rating: 9 out of 10
Value: 10 out of 10
Ease Of Install: 10 out of 10
Requires: Clean the back of your gas tank with rubbing alcohol, an alcohol wipe, or a lint free cloth with dish soap, dry the spot, line up where you want it, remove the backing, line up again and stick to the tank. Run finger or rag over or and make sure it is completely stuck to the tank (no gaps, air, or "non sticking" ends). If misaligned, carefully remove and reinstall it. Done.


This is another one of those "best" and "essential" mods that almost all sport bike riders should have installed. Your jacket zipper or anything else on you can damage the paint of the gas tank on the back from rubbing, plus it is slippery with nothing there. This protects the back of your tank, while decorating the look and provides grip for you to help "stick you to the motorcycle" while riding. There are multiple types and graphics for you to choose from.

18185


(Next Post: Newest Mods)
 

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2021 Ninja 400 ABS
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
My Newest Mods:

Brand: Dynojet
Model: Power Commander V
What it is: Piggyback fuel controller
Cost: $360.00
Rating: 7 out of 10
Value: 7 out of 10
Ease Of Install: 5 out of 10
Requires: Remove the passenger and rider seats, remove rubbery top fairings on both sides, unscrew the gas tank, disconnect the fuel line, lift off and remove gas tank. Remove air box. Install under passenger seat, route wires underneath, hook up correct wires in place of factory connectors. Double check, then reinstall everything. Registering on website and downloading the correct map for your motorcycle and exhaust system.


While powerful, and needed if you cannot do an ECU flash, this really requires a dyno tuning to get the most out of it. The generic maps can ballpark you, but also make your bike run lean or rich if the generic maps are not ideal. Limited map selection on the website. It is also inferior to an ECU tuner, which allows you to tweak a lot more of the parameters and still allow dyno tuning. Still, a good mod if you do not mind the added expense of a dyno tuning, which can be anywhere from $300-$500+ depending on where you live. You also have the option of adding a quickshifter and autotune modules, which are added expenses but can allow you to enhance your motorcycle and tune it for your particular setup.

Brand: Zero Gravity
Model: Double Bubble windscreen in light smoke
What it is: Replacement, improved windscreen from stock.
Cost: $90.00
Rating: 8 out of 10
Value: 8 out of 10
Ease Of Install: 10 out of 10
Requires: Remove rear view mirrors, remove OEM windscreen, put in place, reinstall rear view mirrors. Done.


A nice mod, not really cheap but worth it to me. Easy to install, enhances the looks, and keeps the wind going to your helmet, rather than your chest and helmet like the OEM one does. Choice of clear, light smoke, or dark smoke. I like the looks and usability day or night of the light smoke one.

Brand: TST Industries
Model: TST Emission Block Off Kit
What it is: Allows you to remove your air induction system (AIS), which enhances tuning ability and saves some weight. It comes with a circuit plug to prevent engine codes, a plate, and rubber plug to seal where the AIS hooked up to the motorcycle.
Cost: $34.99
Rating: 8 out of 10
Value: 8 out of 10
Ease Of Install: 6 out of 10
Requires: Remove the passenger and rider seats, remove rubbery top fairings on both sides, unscrew the gas tank, disconnect the fuel line, lift off and remove gas tank. Remove the AIS, disconnect the electrical connector, install the circuit plug in its place. Install the plate where the AIS was removed, install rubber cover to the bottom of the gas tank where the AIS hose attached to it. Reinstall everything.


Really nice kit, high quality and was not that hard to install. It does what it claims and I did notice a lot less popping on deceleration. When I get my Ninja 400 dyno tuned in the middle to end of May, this will be beneficial. What the AIS does is induce air into the system, with the intention of burning unused gasoline (in other words, it is an emissions control device). The issue is, this added air affects the air/fuel ratio and that is why if you are tuning, it is better to not have the AIS system installed.

Brand: Delkevic
Model: X-Oval 13.5" titanium muffler with stainless steel 2-1 headers
What it is: Full Exhaust system.
Cost: $565.99
Rating: 8 out of 10
Value: 9 out of 10
Ease Of Install: 6 out of 10 (Note: Comes with no instructions!)
Requires: Removing entire stock factory silencer, o2 sensor, and headers (easier with fairings off, but can keep them on and just remove both sides of the lower fairings). Replace factory copper gaskets with new ones, install new headers, making sure the copper gaskets stay intact. Header 2 (marked) goes on the exhaust side, Header 1 goes to the shift lever side (torque to proper amount on the header bolts). Install Y pipe to headers, easier to use a wood block and a rubber mallet with gentle taps. Install springs with a tool (allen wrench, spring tool, snips if careful, whatever). Install o2 sensor to the Y pipe. Install down pipe (use included sealant on the clamp) and unscrew bolt under the shifter-lever (can just hold the shift lever down with your hand as you do this), attach bolt to the place in the downpipe and reinstall the bolt to proper torque specs. Attach silencer pipe to the downpipe (clamp and more of the high temp sealant) and the elbow in the proper position (outer elbow facing you standing). Install the silencer and the included bracket and strap (bracket goes inward when correct, towards the back of the bike). Tighten all clamps to proper torque spec and tighten the silencer and bracket fully. A good hour to hour and a half job to do it right and align it, stop to pee or get coffee, etc. ;) ).


Outstanding value, but I had to study the pictures on their website to make sure I was installing this correctly. I see a lot of people installing these Delkevic full systems and silencers wrong (muffler sticking out, etc.) because there is no instructions, but with some studying of the assembled exhaust and looking at the header pics (to make sure you put Header pipe 1 and 2 in the right place), you can figure it out. Sounds good, definitely seemed like I gained some performance (Right now, with my Power Commander V, I am using the Akrapovic full system map. After calibrating the throttle, the motorcycle really hauls.) The profile, IMO, is perfect for the Ninja 400 (with the 13.5" Titanium X-Oval, which is IMO the best looking Delkevic silencer and the perfect size for the profile of the Ninja 400, pic below), the fit and finish is up there, and the stainless steel headers are beautiful. This is also the most expensive Delkevic system, still cheaper than most of the other full systems. The only major downside is the lack of instructions, as these are intended to be dealer or motorcycle mechanic installed. Has a nice deep exhaust note, but not too obnoxious and definitely sounds great opened up. It is louder than stock, but without ever removing the baffle, it is not deafening and you can ride without ear plugs. Here is the pics installed on my Ninja 400, showcasing how it compliments the bike profile. This is also how my motorcycle looks with all my current mods right now as well.
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Brand: YONHAN and OMRON
Model: Dual USB 3.0 Quick charger and genuine Kawasaki Relay kit
What it is: Protects your radiator from flying rocks and debris
Cost: $14.99 (USB charger port) + $19.95 (Relay kit) and male/female bullet connectors (Autozone) $5.00
Rating: 8 out of 10
Value: 8 out of 10
Ease Of Install: 7 out of 10
Requires: Remove left top, bottom, and large fairing (shifter side). Disconnect turn signal and remove the two fuse boxes from the large fairing. With a long phillips head screwdriver, remove phillips-head screw in the back of the factory USB block off plate and pop out. Install relay next to the turn signal (provision already there). Screw in the dual port USB charger (was not easy, I used channel locks because was too hard to screw in by hand). Install ring on the back side to hold in place once all the way screwed in and bottomed out. Cut the wires to the right length (accommodate the bars turned all the way and give about 2-4" more slack then needed just in case) Install male and female bullet connectors (solder, smash on, screw on, etc.) on the USB kit wires. Find the provision for the bullet connectors under the headlights and install the positive and negative in the respective spots (Google or YouTube this install, it is easy but you want to do it right!). I used needle nose pliers to install the negative and positive wires to the USB port. Check all your wiring, turn the motorcycle on and verify the voltage is reading and the unit lights up, if not your did it wrong. Reinstall everything, do not forget to reattach your turn signal on that side!


Yes, this sounds complicated, but if you have any mechanical or electrical aptitude, it is a simple and nice mod. Now you can charge your phone as you ride, or recharge your helmet bluetooth, your GoPro, anything that needs USB power, you got it. Kawasaki has an official kit, likely easier to install (I am guessing plug and play) but is about 5 times more expensive and no voltage display.

Added pluses is it quick charging capable, has a nice voltage display, and a rubber waterproof cover built it, which also dims the bright blue voltage display for night usage. If installed well, it looks factory (should BE factory!)

The hardest part of this install was screwing that USB port all the way in, not easy and took some channel locks behind it and patience to get it screwed all the way down. Make sure your polarity is correct as well before turning on your ignition.
 

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Nice man, I hadn't thought about a radiator guard but I did realize how vulnerable it was Friday night when I took the fairings off for the first time. Just ordered one on Amazon. Also put some frame sliders on Friday night.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Nice man, I hadn't thought about a radiator guard but I did realize how vulnerable it was Friday night when I took the fairings off for the first time. Just ordered one on Amazon. Also put some frame sliders on Friday night.
Thank you, I appreciate it!

I think frame sliders and the radiator guard are essentials for piece of mind, especially considering the cost difference of the parts you have to replace by not having them in case of damage, a drop, or spill.

An added plus is how easy the radiator guard is to install and the provisions for the guard are already on the motorcycle from the factory.
 
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Thank you, I appreciate it!

I think frame sliders and the radiator guard are essentials for piece of mind, especially considering the cost difference of the parts you have to replace by not having them in case of damage, a drop, or spill.

An added plus is how easy the radiator guard is to install and the provisions for the guard are already on the motorcycle from the factory.
Ha I noticed the holes there to mount it and was like well that's weird, then saw your post and realized they must be there for the guard if you wanna add it. Lame they don't put it on from factory but at least the holes are there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ha I noticed the holes there to mount it and was like well that's weird, then saw your post and realized they must be there for the guard if you wanna add it. Lame they don't put it on from factory but at least the holes are there.
They dropped the ball with the factory exhaust and they should have at least included a $40.00 radiator guard, but that is how they claim to "save you money" and keep prices down.

By making you spend more money for aftermarket, they sure saved you some money! :p
 

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Thank you, I appreciate it!

I think frame sliders and the radiator guard are essentials for piece of mind, especially considering the cost difference of the parts you have to replace by not having them in case of damage, a drop, or spill.

An added plus is how easy the radiator guard is to install and the provisions for the guard are already on the motorcycle from the factory.
In prepping for my 600 mile service, I decided to add Shogun sliders and radiator guard while I was at it. Both are reasonably easy to install, especially if you‘re already taking off any fairing pieces. The other “peace of mind” mod I did was Barnett HD springs. Since the oil was out and the bike was torn apart, this $30 part was an easy choice to improve clutch life and performance.

The great part of this forum is posts like yours, This allowed me to research upgrades and known issues, so I could make early mods for the best riding experience. Thanks for the post!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I like to help people, I hope to either point people in the right direction, or save them some money!

When I got my Ninja 400, the frame sliders, radiator guard, and the tail tidy were my "essentials", and the rest I did my homework on. In fact, I bought the tail tidy, frame sliders, and radiator guard while waiting to take possession of my N400.

I am happy with all of my mods, but 2 of them ended up being a waste of money and 1 has a specific use.
 

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rad guards don't come on superbikes from the factory so why would they put them on a 5k commuter bike!!?? guys as a shop owner you will always get what you pay for,most will heed this and others well as we say...it's your money do as you wish ! amazon has great deals on "cheap" products that "work" , do you wounder why none of us guys with lots of know how and experience have bought them "inexpensive" light weight wheels off ebay? same reason you don't see us with knock off levers and rearsets and anything "cheap" save your money and buy the good stuff ONCE instead of buying garbage and wasting your time 2xs !! I'm sure some of you newBs are trying to help other fellow new N400 riders and owners,BUT cheap advice is bad advice
 

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so have to ask...why did you do a full exhaust PCV and smog block off plate?
 

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rad guards don't come on superbikes from the factory so why would they put them on a 5k commuter bike!!?? guys as a shop owner you will always get what you pay for,most will heed this and others well as we say...it's your money do as you wish ! amazon has great deals on "cheap" products that "work" , do you wounder why none of us guys with lots of know how and experience have bought them "inexpensive" light weight wheels off ebay? same reason you don't see us with knock off levers and rearsets and anything "cheap" save your money and buy the good stuff ONCE instead of buying garbage and wasting your time 2xs !! I'm sure some of you newBs are trying to help other fellow new N400 riders and owners,BUT cheap advice is bad advice
So uh, rad guard yay or nay?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
rad guards don't come on superbikes from the factory so why would they put them on a 5k commuter bike!!?? guys as a shop owner you will always get what you pay for,most will heed this and others well as we say...it's your money do as you wish ! amazon has great deals on "cheap" products that "work" , do you wounder why none of us guys with lots of know how and experience have bought them "inexpensive" light weight wheels off ebay? same reason you don't see us with knock off levers and rearsets and anything "cheap" save your money and buy the good stuff ONCE instead of buying garbage and wasting your time 2xs !! I'm sure some of you newBs are trying to help other fellow new N400 riders and owners,BUT cheap advice is bad advice
With all due respect, while I do not totally disagree with you, I can say this. Some people would be completely happy with the motorcycle as it comes. Others will do the basics, (frame sliders, radiator guard, tail tidy, slip-on, etc.). Some will do a lot more, like myself. Others will turn it into a race bike, and even tear into the engine.

This is a thread about mods and my experience with them, and I left it open for others to do the same. This can be helpful for "noobs" and veterans alike.

What this is not is a debate thread, so please stay on topic and I do not like labeling people "noobs". Like them, we had our start at one time as well. I have found some "cheap" mods just as good and useful as very expensive mods, but generally you get what you pay for.

No, I would not advise buying cheap "lightweight" rims, and yes with cheap mods, sometimes you luck out and sometimes you end up buying twice if the first one was no good. But there are some crap expensive parts out there too, so best to read reviews and make sure it is what you want before breaking out your debit card.

That is what this is all about, for example the RanSoto tail tidy I have was cheaper than a lot of the brand names, the end product is just as nice or nicer as a lot of the more expensive ones and even uses your stock lights (so no fooling with cheesy aftermarket lights).
 

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@Zbreima I was at a track day at JGP that these guys from NY/NJ rented for 3 days.the 1st day 2nd session a guy on a R1 got something trusted into his rad and it started leaking....this should answer your Q as he sat the rest of the weekend with his bike on paddock stands !
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
so have to ask...why did you do a full exhaust PCV and smog block off plate?
Full exhaust = Wanted to fine tune the look, sound, and performance. Mission accomplished.
Power Commander V = You must have missed where I said I plan on getting my motorcycle dyno tuned. Also, I wanted the ability to adjust parameters you normally cannot. With the Akrapovic map, the Ninja 400 runs better and faster than a stock and "zero" map (which, as you know, is basically like no PCV installed). The first question dyno tuners here in Illinois have asked me is, "Do I have a Power Commander installed?"

I have also fine tuned the exhaust so it pops less (by modifying the lower RPM range). So far it has been an originally "iffy" upgrade that has helped my motorcycle run better than just the Delkevic and stock ECU. It will pay off further when at the end of this month I get it dyno tuned.

I have a 2021 Ninja 400 ABS, so ECU tuning is so far limited. I would like to eventually do both. Also, considering the bike in stock form runs lean from the factory in the mid RPM range and rich in the high RPM range, now it runs better and less lean or rich in the respective place. The full exhaust definitely made the bike run leaner than the factory exhaust, due to increased air and the headers breathing much better.

AIS block off kit: Removing this has stopped a lot of the popping (due to introducing more air in the system, which the full exhaust system already does) and will be better when I get it dyno tuned (it throws off the Air fuel ratio and makes it read inaccurate)

So uh, rad guard yay or nay?
Risk versus reward, either install a radiator guard, or happily drain your coolant line and replace a not so cheap aluminum radiator when, eventually, you run over rocks or sticks and they plunge into your radiator and it leaks or looks like crap.

No need to pay a ton for one, but silly not to have one in my opinion. It weighs nothing, cheap, and the provisions are there.
 

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@Wraithrider do you understand where your power originates from? do you understand why someone will put a supercharger on a car or turbo? INCLUDING myself,have you seen the guys on here that are racing and list EVERYTHING they have done to the bike? this is a great reference for the 1st timers or guys looking to get more power from this bike....your "tuner" is gonna ask,where is your race filter? as am I !!! I applaud what you're trying to do,and I'll just leave it at that,good luck with your bike
 

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@Wraithrider and a BIG FYI .....for the spirited street geek that will never go to the track or even a track day or 3, flashing and doing the tune directly to the ECU is completely FINE ! racers that need to adjust timing curves fuel maps even going as far as fine tuning each cylinder will install the PCV and there are a few other reason I don't need to get into as you probably already know this !:sneaky:
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
@Wraithrider do you understand where your power originates from? do you understand why someone will put a supercharger on a car or turbo? INCLUDING myself,have you seen the guys on here that are racing and list EVERYTHING they have done to the bike? this is a great reference for the 1st timers or guys looking to get more power from this bike....your "tuner" is gonna ask,where is your race filter? as am I !!! I applaud what you're trying to do,and I'll just leave it at that,good luck with your bike
I'll bite with the race air filter.

I bought one already and will install it before I get it dyno tuned. I did not install it yet, because I have enough air going into the bike already (to where I had to reduce popping) and there is only one generic map for the N400 on the Dynojet site which can use a stock or aftermarket filter. That tune, for another exhaust system available for the N400, does not run as good as the Akrapovic map, lacks power, introduces pops more, and has some dead-spots. Without a dyno, trying to "guess" the right settings is NFG, so I felt installing a race filter on the bike right now would have made it even harder to tame the popping. It would currently hurt more than help.

I also cannot list or include it, because despite owning it, it is not yet installed. I am only rating what I personally installed on my N400.

I am trying to run my motorcycle as good as I can before the dyno tune, then go all out with the dyno tune. Heck yes, I want to do some track days eventually, but a little more power on the street never hurts, either! ;)

As for the ECU flashing, that is an added expense and it is easier to have the Power Commander 5, without it some tuners will not be able (or willing) to modify your ECU. If they are Dynojet based, they would frown upon not having a PC5 installed. The two in Illinois near me both are Dynojet certified, they wanted me to have a PC5 installed in order to tune mine.

Some ECU tuning kits allow you to use PC5 maps, but as far as I know, with mine being a 2021, the ECU is likely a newer model and will not work with the sideload/onboard ECU tuners (yet). FTECU and Woolidge both say they are for the 2018-2019 models. Not sure about the ARacer. When I remove the gas tank again, I will check the serial number of my ECU. One workaround is to buy an older ECU and slap it in there, but I will see how the bike is after the dyno tune. I eventually want both PC5 and ECU tuner, or get rid of the PC5 and just use the ECU tuner with the dyno-tuned map if possible.

A motor is basically an extravagant air pump, the more air it has the more power it makes. A super or turbo charger makes the engine have more air to breath, inducing air makes it breath better.

But with generic, ball-parked PC5 maps, too much air with a full exhaust causes your bike to lean out even more, causing pops (which are normal, but too much can actually blow up your exhaust or cause damage).

There are no Delkevic maps available on the website, so I am sure if I actually had the Akrapovic exhaust, it would run better. Here are the tunes available for the Ninja 400:

Akrapovic, stock air filter: has the best power and performance on my N400, but a little fuel economy hit. I modified the lower RPM range from 2000 up to pop less.

Yoshimura, stock air filter: Runs good, but less power than the Akrapovic map, a little better fuel economy.

Arrow full, stock air filter: Mismatched, according the description it is for a 2019 Honda Talon 1000 w/Trinity Stage 5 full exhaust (with crossover). It will not even let you load this map due to the mismatch.

Arrow Euro, stock or aftermarket filter: Like the Yoshi map, but a little less power and does not run as good as the Akrapovic map.

Leo Vince slip on, stock or aftermarket filter: Would be the map to use for a slip-on, no go for a full exhaust system.

Stock: Mismatched and will not load, but I was able to use it by copying the values for fuel and ignition into Microsoft Excel, making a new map, finally pasting the values back over. Works pretty good on mine, less power, more fuel economy than the Akrapovic map.

Zero Map: Effectively disables the PCV, does not run as good without the PCV installed with the right map on my particular N400.

I did my homework on everything, does not mean I bought all good mods, but I know a thing or 3 due to experience, studying, YouTube, etc! 😆
 
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