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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New to the 400 and never raced. Just a random question as I was thinking about it. What do you guys do as far as racing and replacing stuff. For example, before racing do you replace all of the stock body panels with 'race' ones that don't really matter if they get scratched up? Does anyone race with the stock body work? I know you can get sliders and all that but I'm sure stuff gets wrecked still. Or is that just the price to play - to have replacement parts. Do you assume you're gonna go down?

Going to the track on this thing looks like a **** of a lot of fun. I've never done it but it seems like a great place to learn for the street.
 

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Best advice I could give would be to check the rule book for the race organization you will be racing with.
Most likely you will be required to run a belly pan that holds a specified volume of liquid.
You can still race with stock bodywork, you just have to add a cheap aluminum foil type pan, and secure it.
Track days are a ball on the 400, and I imagine racing to be much more fun and intense.
Go to a track day first, which requires surprisingly little bike prep.
 

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I would start with track days first before you get into racing. If you plan on using the bike for both street and track, then it's going to be more work because it'll be highly advisable to switch back and forth. Almost nobody does that. There are a few, but barely any. All depends on how much you do each. If you ride a lot on the street and plan on doing a few track days a year, then just leave it as is, and take the risk. If or when you crash, then stock bodywork is not really all that hard to find used but in good condition, so it wouldn't be a fortune to replace (now if you had a Ducati or BMW or something like that, then it'd be a different story lol). But if you're like a lot of us who got hooked on the track right away and pretty much gave up street riding after that in exchange for riding only at the track, then definitely get race fairings and make it track-only.
 

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I used to flip my '99 R6 from track to street fairly easily but I had a whole second front clip (front fairing with headlight and gauges, mount & mirrors with signals) that bolted on and off the frame and plugged into the harness. I would plug/un-plug the rear lights/signals etc... I think the rear signals were in the rear Lens?

I had a couple sets of race fairings for my R6 and sacrificed the worst set to cut-out the headlight opening. I would not run the belly pan when it was on the street.

But I ran NO OEM bodywork on that R6...only track bodywork
 

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I would start with track days first before you get into racing.
^Excellent advice!
Also as previously mentioned check the website for a local track day org to see what they're bike prep and rider prep requirements are. At the very least, you'll need a track suit, boots, gloves, and (of course) a recent helmet. For the bike you may only need to tape over the mirrors, tail light, and headlight, as well as ensuring your oil filter is properly secured, tires are good, etc. In other words, try a couple of track days next summer with the bike in stock form to see if you like it and want to pursue the hobby further.

Then, if you decide to stick with it on the following year, you may want to consider making your bike a little more track friendly. For example, clean up the tail and turn signals with some TST components, add a set of rear-set risers from Norton, and put on a DOT/track tire like the Q3+, or the new Q5. You may also want to lower the handle bars a touch. With these updates, you can still keep the bike street legal, but you will also appreciate these track oriented updates.

Beyond the updates on the bike as described above, the sky's the limit if you want to transform your bike into a dedicated track bike. Of course, if you decide at any point that you want to 'race', then your bike will have to meet all the specifications and requirements for the race organization.

Hope this helps and good luck with whatever you do!
 

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@Deal Breaker hit the nail on the head. Find a local track day group and read their prep requirements. Normally they're pretty minimal, esp for newcomers. Don't worry about parts at first beyond whatever's required and tires if you need them (I second the vote on the Q series from dunlop). From there, as you get sucked into the addiction you can either upgrade parts as needed or if you decide down the road you want to race then consider buying a prepped race bike as it's often cheaper.
That first few track days is really about learning your way around, getting comfortable in a new environment etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
All good advice - thanks. Track days sounds like a lot of fun. I'll have to look around and see what's available. I'm in NE Ohio so there is Nelsons Roadcourse and also Mid Ohio but I'm not sure what they have for bike events.
 

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All good advice - thanks. Track days sounds like a lot of fun. I'll have to look around and see what's available. I'm in NE Ohio so there is Nelsons Roadcourse and also Mid Ohio but I'm not sure what they have for bike events.

I'm offering up my track days with N2 to anyone interested in doing a track day.
There's $380 available in my account that I'll transfer via N2 to anyone that may want to go to a track day via N2Trackdays on the days they host.

As ee the link I posted above.
Follow the link for N2 and see if they'll host an event near you. If so then register with N2 and PM me with the info and I'll then transfer my track day money to your account.

Full leathers will be needed for a track day and can be rented a long with boots and gloves for a reasonable amount of $$.

Just a thought. 🤙
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

I'm offering up my track days with N2 to anyone interested in doing a track day.
There's $380 available in my account that I'll transfer via N2 to anyone that may want to go to a track day via N2Trackdays on the days they host.

As ee the link I posted above.
Follow the link for N2 and see if they'll host an event near you. If so then register with N2 and PM me with the info and I'll then transfer my track day money to your account.

Full leathers will be needed for a track day and can be rented a long with boots and gloves for a reasonable amount of $$.

Just a thought. 🤙
Wow! That's pretty generous! I'll check it out. Pitt Race is less than 2 hours from me. Lots to check out...
 

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I have been trying to get too PITTRACE the last few seasons. EvolveGT goes there usually twice a season, once in May and again in August. The weather in early May is iffy, but August is doable. My track buddies wedding anniversary is always when EvolveGT goes in August. N2 usually goes once a month from May thru September. I have ridden with both orgs, and would recommend either for track days. I have gotten a membership with EvolveGT the last 5 or 6 seasons. They hit more of the tracks I like.
 

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I've heard good things about Pitt Race. MotoAmerica is there in mid August and I'm hoping to attend, as I've been wanting to see one of these events live for a while. My understanding is that much of the track can be seen from "Spectator Hill". It's a bit of a haul from home, but I think It'll be worth the gas.
 

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PittRace is a kickass track! Don't think I would recommend that for a first track day though. Go to Nelson Ledges first, do a track day there, and then go to Pitt.
Evolve GT will put him in a class(GT1), and help him get up to speed safely with track riding.
If you have a significant amount of twisty street riding under your belt, you will be fine.
 

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Evolve GT will put him in a class(GT1), and help him get up to speed safely with track riding.
If you have a significant amount of twisty street riding under your belt, you will be fine.
True, their beginner class is good. But still, that track can be a bit overwhelming for a beginner, so when compared to Nelson Ledges, NL is a LOT easier, and more beginner-friendly than Pitt. I've seen lots of crashes happen at PittRace in novice group and intermediate.
 

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True, their beginner class is good. But still, that track can be a bit overwhelming for a beginner, so when compared to Nelson Ledges, NL is a LOT easier, and more beginner-friendly than Pitt. I've seen lots of crashes happen at PittRace in novice group and intermediate.
Probably good advice to go elsewhere.
I haven't ridden Pitt race, but I have watched on bike videos. Kind of like staying at a Holiday Inn Express, I guess?
My wife did her first track day at Polecat Training Center. It is a crazy track, even for an experienced rider.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Just to bring this back around.. I am signed up for an N2 track day at Pitt Race and super stoked for it (thanks @misnblu ). Question - does it make any sense to remove the stock OEM bodywork to avoid damage in the event of a crash? Can you run without it? I'm still a beginner rider and never done a track day.
 

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Just to bring this back around.. I am signed up for an N2 track day at Pitt Race and super stoked for it (thanks @misnblu ). Question - does it make any sense to remove the stock OEM bodywork to avoid damage in the event of a crash? Can you run without it? I'm still a beginner rider and never done a track day.
Don't worry about crashing.
Worry about having fun, a good time, and a chance to learn to ride the bike as it should be ridden. 🙏🏽

You'll also be placed in the Novice group of first time riders where in the first session you'll be going around the track at a slow speed to see the race line and get a feel for what you're doing. It's quite orderly.

Second session the pace will pick up a bit as all the Novice riders will go around the track following the Instructor on the proper line.

Third session is usually where you will go out in the. I ice group and have free access to the track to practice what you were taught in class and on track in the previous sessions.

An instructor or two will always be with you on the track for personal help or questions you may have about your riding and can even follow you for a few laps to critique you on improving those areas you may need to help be more comfortable at a higher pace.

It's not racing. It's you enjoying your steed on a safe environment to learn your abilities of riding properly.
Enjoy it and don't over think it. Everyone there is there to help and are doing the same as you.

You'll come away after doing this wanting to learn more and will probably be back on track before you know it.
Best of luck. 🤙
 
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