Ninja 400 Riders Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey, I've got a 2018 Ninja 400 and was wondering if anyone might have a bit of knowledge about an issue I'm having.
Recently, my check engine light came on and I checked the code to find that there was an issue with the oxygen sensor.
Now, buying a new OEM replacement is ludicrously expensive, so I decided to try and find asecond hand part online. I found one for less than a third of what I would pay new and ordered it. After a few weeks of waiting it's finally here.
Unfortunately, the thread size on the replacement is far too big and won't fit into the hole in the exhaust pipe. The two oxygen sensors are comletely identical except for one thing- the replacement one appears to have an adapter fitted onto the original threads so that it can fit a mugh larger threadded hole. I've tried very hard to unscrew it so that I can use it but I've had no success. it's either glued in there or I'm mistaken and it's actually just one piece. Has anyone had any experience with this? any input would be very much appreciated.
I've attached some photos so you can see what I'm talking about.
17704
17705

You can see that on my replacement part (left) it looks like there's been a ring installed over the top of the original threads with a larger thread and hex bolt part. When you look at the right image (one I've pulled from online which looks like my old broken part) you can see that everything else should be there under that larger ring.
Unless I'm going crazy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Ugh...
Nevermind. After 2 hours of researching and stressing over it etc, I've finally managed to get it off with a couple of wrenches.
17706

FYI anyone who's had a similar problem. I still have no idea what the other part was for. Maybe an aftermarket exhaust? Anyway. It comes off with a bit of elbow grease...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Ugh...
Nevermind. After 2 hours of researching and stressing over it etc, I've finally managed to get it off with a couple of wrenches.
View attachment 17706
FYI anyone who's had a similar problem. I still have no idea what the other part was for. Maybe an aftermarket exhaust? Anyway. It comes off with a bit of elbow grease...
Where did you get the part, was it second hand or from a retailer? My 2018 has exactly the same issue as yours it sounds like, random error 67 and occasional 33? Happened around the 32,000km mark.

Edit: nevermind, just re read the post and saw its second hand, I was rushed in my excitement to find someone going through the same misery as me lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Where did you get the part, was it second hand or from a retailer? My 2018 has exactly the same issue as yours it sounds like, random error 67 and occasional 33? Happened around the 32,000km mark.

Edit: nevermind, just re read the post and saw its second hand, I was rushed in my excitement to find someone going through the same misery as me lol.
Yeah, I found a few used ones online for about 80-100AUD. There aren't many out there. New ones from a genuine parts store are about 320AUD, not including postage.

Mine suddenly went at about 17,000km, same error codes as you. Pretty expensive thing to randomly break like that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Yeah, I found a few used ones online for about 80-100AUD. There aren't many out there. New ones from a genuine parts store are about 320AUD, not including postage.

Mine suddenly went at about 17,000km, same error codes as you. Pretty expensive thing to randomly break like that.
I think that's why I see and hear about people getting O2 eliminators all the time. If you look through Ebay it's pretty easy to see there are way more options for an eliminator than there are for the O2.

I have a theory on why they seem to be going out sooner all the time and wondering if anyone would care to chime in.
With emissions standards becoming increasingly stringent these things run SOO lean. Right on the knifes edge of too lean (mid 14.XX:1 AFR). This makes more heat, and the O2 sensor being in the nastiest spot on your bike it takes the brunt of that heat. Even as short as 5 years ago it was more common to see bikes in the 13.XX:1 AFR range and 14 was considered a problem. O2 sensors going out before 50 000km's used to be an anomaly but now I keep hearing about them being toast under 20 000. I don't believe the sensors have changed since a lot are still using the same part number (although the manufacturing process still could have changed). Anyone agree or disagree?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
398 Posts
Disagree. The o2 sensor actually has a heater element built into it. The purpose is to maintain a constant temperature for the sensor which is higher than the exhaust gas temperature.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top