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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I'm a new rider and I just bought my first bike. I have the black/yellow/grey Ninja 400 ABS model. I just rode it for the second time today and it feels great. Eventually, I plan to commute to work on the bike (I'm a lawyer) and visit friends who live in DMV.

I've been checking out the forums for a few weeks and all of you have been helpful. Thanks to the advice here, I chose the Ninja 400 over the Honda CBR500R. I'm currently riding around my neighborhood, going to Starbucks in the morning, and learning basic motorcycle maintenance.
 

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Hello, I'm a new rider and I just bought my first bike. I have the black/yellow/grey Ninja 400 ABS model. I just rode it for the second time today and it feels great. Eventually, I plan to commute to work on the bike (I'm a lawyer) and visit friends who live in DMV.

I've been checking out the forums for a few weeks and all of you have been helpful. Thanks to the advice here, I chose the Ninja 400 over the Honda CBR500R. I'm currently riding around my neighborhood, going to Starbucks in the morning, and learning basic motorcycle maintenance.
Welcome to the forums MrMinsu, Always nice to have another friendly person join us.

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Mr Mikes personal Disclaimer: Make sure you read and understand the forums legal disclaimer, This is an " opinion ' based social environment. while people in this forum do try and give good advice its very likely to contain inaccurate information, You are responsible for your use / usage of any and all advice received from this forum and should always seek out qualified professional counsel pertaining to your motorcycle and personal safety in its use. By continuing to read, use & interact with these forums you agree to hold harmless the forum and people here in from any advice received.

Sorry for that but we had a lawyer infiltrate my class at the Real Estate inspection school with the sole purpose of learning the ins and outs of the course so he can sue my profession.

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I like your bike choice - Really like that color... Have you taken an (MSC ) Motorcycle Safety Course..? How many miles does your bike have currently have - No need to be shy your welcome here, people here come from all walks of life both young and old - You made a great choice in your bike as learning vehicle but be cautious its not a toy.

Riding a bike is one of the great things in life you will remember as the exciting moments you had, you'll cherish them if you just take your time and learn how to be safe, don't ever push the limit of the bike past your own abilities, Always wear your helmet no matter what - It will save your life. The number one mistake riders make is cornering to fast.

Keep 120% of your attention on the road, get a small back pack and put your phone there out of reach while you ride, Never take your eyes off the road, during these next couple month keep your speed and distance to other vehicles extra for mistake room... Don't put your self in harms way is your stratagy - Ride safe, Grats on our new bike.

So you have friends that live at the (DMV) Division of Motor Vehicles... :grin: had to I thought it was funny..! I've only been in your neck of the woods one time, the family and I really enjoyed DC and the surrounding area allot. Nice to meet ya sir.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes, I've taken the MSF Basic Rider Course. In Maryland, it's far easier to obtain a motorcycle license through the 3-day MSF course versus getting it via motorcycle permit process. I actually took 6.5 hours of training before I took the BRC. In Virginia, a couple motorcycle schools offer Head Start and novice courses. Head Start covers the first 3 exercises of the BRC, which is great for anyone who's unfamiliar with riding and wants a taste of it. I took the classes and had incredible RiderCoaches at each institution. I wish Maryland schools would offer the same.

Between yesterday and today, I've put 25 miles on my bike. I'm riding in my neighborhood. Mostly hills, stop signs, and a few speed humps. For the first time today, I rode to Starbucks. It was my first time on a bike at a stoplight. I even saluted my first motorcyclists. I felt so cool. I feel like a teenager again learning how to drive a car. I'm paranoid of my surroundings while also gleeful to finally be behind the [handlebars]. Tomorrow, during my lunch break, I plan to ride to Target to pick up some photos and grab lunch (about 30 min. roundtrip).
 

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Yes, I've taken the MSF Basic Rider Course. In Maryland, it's far easier to obtain a motorcycle license through the 3-day MSF course versus getting it via motorcycle permit process. I actually took 6.5 hours of training before I took the BRC. In Virginia, a couple motorcycle schools offer Head Start and novice courses. Head Start covers the first 3 exercises of the BRC, which is great for anyone who's unfamiliar with riding and wants a taste of it. I took the classes and had incredible RiderCoaches at each institution. I wish Maryland schools would offer the same.

Between yesterday and today, I've put 25 miles on my bike. I'm riding in my neighborhood. Mostly hills, stop signs, and a few speed humps. For the first time today, I rode to Starbucks. It was my first time on a bike at a stoplight. I even saluted my first motorcyclists. I felt so cool. I feel like a teenager again learning how to drive a car. I'm paranoid of my surroundings while also gleeful to finally be behind the [handlebars]. Tomorrow, during my lunch break, I plan to ride to Target to pick up some photos and grab lunch (about 30 min. roundtrip).
Glad to hear you took a safety course for beginners... If you can I would recommend you take an intermediate course as well, the next big thing to learn is how to do emergency Stopping & Evasion. As you know staying out of trouble is just as easy as getting your self in trouble, but sometimes you have no choice but to take Action to avoid an accident.

Unlike in a car where you feel safe - On a bike in an accident it doesn't matter who is right or wrong, No matter what you loose. You have to have the ability to second guess what everyone around you is doing, just because your lane looks clear... if you see several cars slowing down there may be some one crossing the road or a car that will cross your lane so take action in advance. many times there are no tell tell signs of impending danger and this is where cat like reflexes come in play... and where skills you have previously learned will help you - so I suggest you take extra classes.

You may make a friend or two while your there and take some road trips...
 

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Welcome to the forums! I agree, this forum is a great place to learn about our bikes. I'm also a new rider with a black 400 ABS as first bike. Love it! If you have not yet, you should ride around the Loch Raven Reservoir, it's beautiful (specially sunset), nice ride, good restaurants nearby. Totally worth it! Attached are some of my pictures!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Welcome to the forums! I agree, this forum is a great place to learn about our bikes. I'm also a new rider with a black 400 ABS as first bike. Love it! If you have not yet, you should ride around the Loch Raven Reservoir, it's beautiful (specially sunset), nice ride, good restaurants nearby. Totally worth it! Attached are some of my pictures!
Your photos are gorgeous. That sounds like a find ride to make. I work somewhat near Loch Raven and I haven't been there in a while. Hmm. I appreciate the idea.

Yesterday, I rode to work for the first time via Route 1 (Hyattsville to Woodlawn). It was nice riding early in the morning, missing much of the morning rush hour traffic. On the way home, however, I was caught in a surprise thunderstorm and had to take cover at a Subway. Thankfully, it didn't last long and I was back on the road. When I arrived home, my odometer read 500 miles.

I'm going to ride back to work tomorrow and I may take the B/W Parkway. At 6,000 rpms, I can make the speed limit and have minimal traffic if I leave before 6 a.m.
 

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Your photos are gorgeous. That sounds like a find ride to make. I work somewhat near Loch Raven and I haven't been there in a while. Hmm. I appreciate the idea.

Yesterday, I rode to work for the first time via Route 1 (Hyattsville to Woodlawn). It was nice riding early in the morning, missing much of the morning rush hour traffic. On the way home, however, I was caught in a surprise thunderstorm and had to take cover at a Subway. Thankfully, it didn't last long and I was back on the road. When I arrived home, my odometer read 500 miles.

I'm going to ride back to work tomorrow and I may take the B/W Parkway. At 6,000 rpms, I can make the speed limit and have minimal traffic if I leave before 6 a.m.
Don't forget your first servicing (600mi) which should be coming up soon. My 400 only has 55 miles on it, and I've already gotten it wet :sad:.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
600-mile Check-In

I recently passed the 600-mile threshold and had my first oil change. I opted to have my Kawasaki dealership perform the 600-mile service because I get discounts as a new rider, free pick-up from my home, and a place to keep my bike safe while I was away for the weekend. By the time I returned home, my bike was ready.

I admit my paranoia in babbying my bike during the break-in period. Never before had I traveled so many local roads. My farthest journey up to that point was riding from my home in Prince George's Co. to Baltimore City for work. It was a long journey on Rt. 1 but I'm glad I did it. I was forced to work on shifting up and down gears, riding the speed limit, and navigating weekday and weekend traffic. My bike and I performed well.

When my bike was ready, I took the metro into Northern Virginia with my gear. This was going to be my first ride in Virginia and my first time crossing the Potomac in DC. Thankfully, my bike had no issues. I was ready to ride.

I rode through Arlington and across the Memorial Bridge to the Lincoln Memorial, and then down Constitution Avenue, past the White House, Washington Monument, and Treasury Department. It was hot, bright outside with plenty of tourists surrounding me.

I had a smooth trip across the District until I was near the Maryland border. New York Avenue had bumper-to-bumper traffic. Even though it was a weekday, it was close enough to the weekend that folks were trying to leave town. New York Avenue is a popular means to go to the Capital Beltway, I-95, and Rt-50. It's also a tight street with residential houses on either side, bumpy surfaces, and slim (if any) barrier between the left lane and opposing traffic.

I didn't expect this traffic jam but I was also stuck for about a half mile away from the nearest practical exit. So, I practiced my clutch control. When there was a chance to filter up to a light, I took it (politely, lol). I was hyper aware of my surroundings (cars, trucks, pedestrians, and a lonely scooter).

After what felt like forever, I found a cross street where I could escape. I took one of the side streets and rode to a grocery store, where I could get free water and feel the A/C blowing. I waited for traffic to die down before I got back on my bike and rode it straight home. It was a near 2 hour journey but a great feat. My longest ride yet and I survived.

My next big trip will be to Annapolis and maybe to Mount Vernon. I would like to do some Revolutionary War-inspired trips in the future.
 

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Hello, I'm a new rider and I just bought my first bike. I have the black/yellow/grey Ninja 400 ABS model. I just rode it for the second time today and it feels great. Eventually, I plan to commute to work on the bike (I'm a lawyer) and visit friends who live in DMV.

I've been checking out the forums for a few weeks and all of you have been helpful. Thanks to the advice here, I chose the Ninja 400 over the Honda CBR500R. I'm currently riding around my neighborhood, going to Starbucks in the morning, and learning basic motorcycle maintenance.
Gratzz and welcome!!! Gorgeous ride you got :) Sounds like you got a good plan going...lol actually it mirrored my own. I also plan to commute to work on mine.

I started in a parking lot, doing tight turns and cornering, moving at a very slow pace to get used to the weight distribution of myself and the bike; as well as abrupt acceleration and abrupt braking (which I had to use twice in the lot) I literally did 48 miles of practice in a small parking lot that had all sorts of obstacles, including humans! LOL! the 48miles equated to about 10hrs of riding practice, before I got on the streets.

Anyway, my logic behind this was, I'd rather learn my bike in a confined "safe" area before trying to learn it on the streets with cars. By the time I hit the streets, I only wanted to focus on learning how people drive and navigating amongst them, rather than trying to learn them and my bike as well.

I must say it has worked out quite well for me. Now, riding my bike is a "no brainer". I "know" my bike, so now i can properly focus on defensive riding among cars; ofc I'm still learning things about my bike, the proper way to stop and start, with regards to integrating my feet more for stability.

Anyway, I just joined this forum and the riders here are AMAZING. Very positive and full of helpful information. They are a resource that I find invaluable when it comes to novice riders and skilled as well. They've given me more confidence in a couple weeks than I've had in 2 months riding alone (before joining)!

Sorry for the book...but just wanted to throw some positive vibezz ur way and to say how much I appreciate the members of this forum <3
 

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600-mile Check-In

I recently passed the 600-mile threshold and had my first oil change. I opted to have my Kawasaki dealership perform the 600-mile service because I get discounts as a new rider, free pick-up from my home, and a place to keep my bike safe while I was away for the weekend. By the time I returned home, my bike was ready.

I admit my paranoia in babbying my bike during the break-in period. Never before had I traveled so many local roads. My farthest journey up to that point was riding from my home in Prince George's Co. to Baltimore City for work. It was a long journey on Rt. 1 but I'm glad I did it. I was forced to work on shifting up and down gears, riding the speed limit, and navigating weekday and weekend traffic. My bike and I performed well.

When my bike was ready, I took the metro into Northern Virginia with my gear. This was going to be my first ride in Virginia and my first time crossing the Potomac in DC. Thankfully, my bike had no issues. I was ready to ride.

I rode through Arlington and across the Memorial Bridge to the Lincoln Memorial, and then down Constitution Avenue, past the White House, Washington Monument, and Treasury Department. It was hot, bright outside with plenty of tourists surrounding me.

I had a smooth trip across the District until I was near the Maryland border. New York Avenue had bumper-to-bumper traffic. Even though it was a weekday, it was close enough to the weekend that folks were trying to leave town. New York Avenue is a popular means to go to the Capital Beltway, I-95, and Rt-50. It's also a tight street with residential houses on either side, bumpy surfaces, and slim (if any) barrier between the left lane and opposing traffic.

I didn't expect this traffic jam but I was also stuck for about a half mile away from the nearest practical exit. So, I practiced my clutch control. When there was a chance to filter up to a light, I took it (politely, lol). I was hyper aware of my surroundings (cars, trucks, pedestrians, and a lonely scooter).

After what felt like forever, I found a cross street where I could escape. I took one of the side streets and rode to a grocery store, where I could get free water and feel the A/C blowing. I waited for traffic to die down before I got back on my bike and rode it straight home. It was a near 2 hour journey but a great feat. My longest ride yet and I survived.

My next big trip will be to Annapolis and maybe to Mount Vernon. I would like to do some Revolutionary War-inspired trips in the future.
Amazinggg! Look at you! Gratzzzz :) :3tens:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Gratzz and welcome!!! Gorgeous ride you got :) Sounds like you got a good plan going...lol actually it mirrored my own. I also plan to commute to work on mine.

I started in a parking lot, doing tight turns and cornering, moving at a very slow pace to get used to the weight distribution of myself and the bike; as well as abrupt acceleration and abrupt braking (which I had to use twice in the lot) I literally did 48 miles of practice in a small parking lot that had all sorts of obstacles, including humans! LOL! the 48miles equated to about 10hrs of riding practice, before I got on the streets.

Anyway, my logic behind this was, I'd rather learn my bike in a confined "safe" area before trying to learn it on the streets with cars. By the time I hit the streets, I only wanted to focus on learning how people drive and navigating amongst them, rather than trying to learn them and my bike as well.

I must say it has worked out quite well for me. Now, riding my bike is a "no brainer". I "know" my bike, so now i can properly focus on defensive riding among cars; ofc I'm still learning things about my bike, the proper way to stop and start, with regards to integrating my feet more for stability.

Anyway, I just joined this forum and the riders here are AMAZING. Very positive and full of helpful information. They are a resource that I find invaluable when it comes to novice riders and skilled as well. They've given me more confidence in a couple weeks than I've had in 2 months riding alone (before joining)!

Sorry for the book...but just wanted to throw some positive vibezz ur way and to say how much I appreciate the members of this forum <3
Thank you so much for your response. Yes, I agree, this forum has been helpful in learning the Ninja 400. It's a small beast and it grabs a lot of attention when I'm out about. Over Labor Day weekend, I rode a few times for groceries and, for the second time, I went to Adams Morgan with a few friends. They drove their cars and I rode my bike. They had to circle a few blocks for a parking space whereas I had a spot in a designated motorcycle space in front of our meetup. It was a breeze riding down U Street, dodging Ubers and Metrobuses and their drunken passengers.

I hope you had a good time riding around Houston. Thank you again for your stories. I can't wait to hear more of your motorcycle journey.

MrMinsu
 

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Discussion Starter #16
If you are looking for a nice scenic ride. Take a ride around the loch raven reservoir
You have given me another reason to ride to Baltimore tomorrow. I have a few errands to run in Randallstown. I could make a detour to Loch Raven and see the public works. Thanks for the tip.
 
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