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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All, I'm new here and I hope this is of some interest. I'm late to the party having just recently purchased a second hand 19 KRT with 17000kms on the clock. I'm from Perth Western Australia so I'll be using the Metric scale. Apologies to the good people's of Merica. This post will be about the beginning. I bought this bike fairly cheap at $5500 AU. That's because TBH it was a little bit rough. Very filthy and just ridden, not taken care of. Some tiny scratches on the RHS where it has kissed the ground. First thing, clean it.
I washed, scrubbed, degreased, decontaminated, washed, clay barred, polished, buffed, waxed and treated. After 14 hours of detailing work over 2 days it was looking pretty **** good. Definately have recovered the neglect and added value to it. Some of the processes include polishing and coating the wheels, removing front sprocket cover and doing a full decontam on the chain, polishing the instrument cluster face, removing the forks and polishing out the rust spots, treating all the black plastic with Maguiars gold class trim detailer and waxing the paintwork with Jet by NV. Haven't been able to remove all imperfections from the paintwork but it's quite good now and the surface is as smooth as a baby's bum. Now onto the improvements!
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The next thing I did, as with any new bike, is change the oil and filter. This one had been serviced 2k ago but I didn't like the look of the oil and always better to know what you are dealing with. I used top of the line Penrite full synthetic POA ester 10w-30. Oil capacity is 2 litres with a filter change.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Next on the list was new tyres. It had the original front and the wrong size rear (140/70/17). There is nothing like 2 new tyres to get the best out of your bike. I chose Metzeler M9 RRs. I've been using Metzeler for a while now and they are fantastic tyres. These ones are brilliant and give so much confidence and a beautiful tip in feel. All the grip you could ask for and in all conditions. Only Pirelli Corsa SPs would be better (in the dry). I had fitted some lovely powder coated metal right angle valve stems at the same time. Makes checking tyre pressure Soooo much easier and they look great.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This bike came with a Coffman silencer. It's quite good. It sits nicely on the bike, it's light and it's somewhat loud with a nice exhaust note. So I've decided to keep it. And I hate spending money replacing an aftermarket part unless it's got to be done. So I figure if you have a muffler you need a full system to complete the deal. I found a really cheap set of Mussari headers for $225 AU. I think they are good enough. So I fitted them on. No problem and mated with the Coffman easily. It's louder and meatier sounding now. A review will follow as I'm going really easy on the bike for now until I get a custom dyno tune done this week.
Fitting the headers only took 1 hour. No complications encountered. Used copper grease on all threads
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Next on the list was suspension upgrades. I decided to go with the YSS fork upgrade kit and YSS rear shock. I just got the basic shock with preload and rebound adjustment. I was very confident this would be enough for the road and even good for track days. And it is! $600.
I was torn with the forks. I really want the 20mm fork cartridges. Would have been very cool. But in the end I decided the upgrade kit would be good enough for my purposes. And it is! $450. Bargain!
Installation was straight forward and took me 3.5 hrs in total front and rear. Instructions were for 440ml of 20W oil and 100ml air gap (fork fully compressed, none of the parts from the kit put in). I had to use 500ml of oil to get the 100mm air gap. Fair enough it is what it is and I feel I've got it right.
I took the opportunity to raise the forks 10mm up through the triple clamp. So it's like lowering the front. And I raised the rear ride height the maximum 5mm allowed on the new shock.
The result has been super impressive with massive handling gains. The bike just falls into a corner and holds the line beautifully. Braking is massively improved because the bike no longer dives under brakes and making the bike unstable and triggering the rear ABS. Much improved compression on the front. Just forget the rear. It's doing it's thing without you having to think about it. Bike handles like a sorted sports bike should. Will keep up with anything in the curves and corners now. Very happy with this budget upgrade. Spending more is not always necessary! BTW the new shock is a lot lighter than the OEM steel one. Another handy weight saving.
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Your cleaning has made my OCD happy! ;)

I have had those tires (or is it tyres?) for a bit over 2000 miles. I've liked them. Confident in twisties and apparently also getting reasonable wear on the highways.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you 🙏
Chain cleaning brushes are fantastic. You can get one on ebay for $5.
Put the bike on a rear stand. Put newspaper layers under the chain area. Put kerosene in a spray bottle. Carefully spray a little bit of kerosene on the inside of the chain. Use the chain brush applying pressure on all sides as you go. Switch to a rag and soak up all the residue and crud by first holding the rag around the chain and spinning the wheel then wiping each segment with the rag. Keep repeating until all the gunge is gone. It will take a while. Keep wiping the sprocket until it's clean. You can switch to WD40 when you are getting close to clean. Then go to clean dry rags for the final clean. Then a LIGHT application of chain lube to the inner surface of the chain. Happy days
 

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2019 Kawsaki Ninja 400 EX400
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Next on the list was suspension upgrades. I decided to go with the YSS fork upgrade kit and YSS rear shock. I just got the basic shock with preload and rebound adjustment. I was very confident this would be enough for the road and even good for track days. And it is! $600.
I was torn with the forks. I really want the 20mm fork cartridges. Would have been very cool. But in the end I decided the upgrade kit would be good enough for my purposes. And it is! $450. Bargain!
Installation was straight forward and took me 3.5 hrs in total front and rear. Instructions were for 440ml of 20W oil and 100ml air gap (fork fully compressed, none of the parts from the kit put in). I had to use 500ml of oil to get the 100mm air gap. Fair enough it is what it is and I feel I've got it right.
I took the opportunity to raise the forks 10mm up through the triple clamp. So it's like lowering the front. And I raised the rear ride height the maximum 5mm allowed on the new shock.
The result has been super impressive with massive handling gains. The bike just falls into a corner and holds the line beautifully. Braking is massively improved because the bike no longer dives under brakes and making the bike unstable and triggering the rear ABS. Much improved compression on the front. Just forget the rear. It's doing it's thing without you having to think about it. Bike handles like a sorted sports bike should. Will keep up with anything in the curves and corners now. Very happy with this budget upgrade. Spending more is not always necessary! BTW the new shock is a lot lighter than the OEM steel one. Another handy weight saving. View attachment 20383 View attachment 20384 View attachment 20385
Nice. I upgraded to the GSXR1000 rear shock in mine and so far have just changed my front oil to a thicker grade. I’ve seen much improvement from just doing that so far myself.
 

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2019 Kawsaki Ninja 400 EX400
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Nice! I'm looking for a GSX shock too. Do you know what year of GSXR1000 you got? Did it lower the rear?
Yeah it’s off a 2012 model. I think it’s the 2009-2012 GSXR600, 750 and 1000 that all work. The 1000 has a slightly different spring rate in it. Doesn’t lower the rear, you flip the top bracket upside down when installing it which makes up for the length difference.
I bought mine second hand off eBay. Cheap upgrade for a fully adjustable shock.
 

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2013 Ninja 300
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Yeah it’s off a 2012 model. I think it’s the 2009-2012 GSXR600, 750 and 1000 that all work. The 1000 has a slightly different spring rate in it. Doesn’t lower the rear, you flip the top bracket upside down when installing it which makes up for the length difference.
I bought mine second hand off eBay. Cheap upgrade for a fully adjustable shock.
Thanks! Do you know the spring rates? I weight 155lbs without gear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
So I took my bike into the tuner guy for a custom dyno tune. It didn't go according to plan. I didn't really understand the tuning process before this but I did learn a lot during this process. So they have to take out your O2 sensor, which is a narrow band one, and put in there wide band O2 sensor. I have Mussari headers which keep the O2 sensor in the same spot as the original headers. There is not enough clearance to fit the wide band sensor. I would have to move the plug hole to a different spot. That's a major hassle that would Involve taking the headers to a fabricator. Anyway the backup plan is to put the sniffer down the muffler to get the readings he needs. I've got a Coffmans slip on and the baffle blocks the pathway through the muffler. Ugghhhh! I was told that the bike runs dramatically different with the baffle removed. Much louder (too loud) and it drinks fuel. So that wasn't an option. So he was not able to fully tune it. But he did half tune it. He added more fuel at the top and I got 3hp more. The bike does feel better everywhere and I now don't have to worry about it running lean and causing damage.
Overall a bit of a letdown but I did get gains and it only cost me half what it was going to.
A side effect of this was that I lost all my economy and range readings from the dash. I presume this is because the O2 sensor was switched off by the tuner. He did say that if you leave it on it can lean out the bike. Can anyone confirm this?
What should I do, just settle for what I've got or make alterations to the exhaust so it can be fully tuned
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Today I fitted a radiator guard that I bought for $35 AU on eBay. Was really good quality and fitted perfectly. I took the easy way out and used cable ties to attach it which I think was fine. The other option would be to buy 316 stainless bolts and nuts. But I couldn't be bothered!
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