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Discussion Starter #1
If i change my gearing, can i achieve lower RPM's at higher speeds?
It's annoying going 80 MPH down the highway and being at 8-9k RPM in 6th gear.
 

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Yep, a 15 tooth front or a 38 tooth rear. You'll have to jump the clutch switch plug to avoid throwing a code and loss of gear indicator. I'm running a 38 tooth and I like it...

Have a read...

 

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Discussion Starter #4
15T front sprocket is easiest and cheapest to swap out but puts your axle forward in the swing arm slot. 38T rear puts it back for longer wheel base and more stability. Personal preference.
I used Gearing Commander - Motorcycle Speed and Drive Train Calculator v7 to compare the differences between the two options.
Stock: 14 front / 41 rear
Current: 14 front / 38 rear
Custom: 15 front / 41 rear
13922


From what the other thread says, if you go over 7% then you have to jump the clutch switch plug to avoid throwing a code and loss of gear indicator.
Unless i'm reading this wrong, moving the rear tire forward .02" due to a 15 front / 41 rear setup seems pretty insignificant if it means i don't have to mess with the clutch switch.
 

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Unless i'm reading this wrong, moving the rear tire forward .02" due to a 15 front / 41 rear setup seems pretty insignificant if it means i don't have to mess with the clutch switch.
A 15 tooth front will still throw the code.,.
 

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I'm due for a new chain and sprockets... can someone elaborate on "jump the clutch switch plug"? What is the clutch switch plug, and what does it mean to "jump" it?
 

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I think we need to start a thread on this as I must have explained this at least half a dozen times now lol.

OK, so there is a safety cut out switch attached to the clutch lever that prevents you from starting the bike in gear UNLESS the clutch is pulled in. The switch is attached to the bottom of the clutch perch (the bit that holds the lever) and needs to be bridged out so that the ECU thinks the clutch is in the pulled in position permanently. How and why this stops an error code showing from a gearing change I have absolutely no idea but bikes brains are complicated these days so just go with it.
So the easiest way and less permanent way to bridge the circuit is to pull the plug out of the switch and bridge the two wires on the lead in your hand NOT the switch on the bike as others have mistakenly done. The powered wire is in the lead, not the switch. You can use a small piece of electrical wire to bridge the two terminals but a paper clip is popular. If you use something thin and flexible like a paper clip then you can apparently put the plug back in the switch holder again where it came from to keep things neat. Myself, I wrapped the end of the lead in electrical tape to hold my piece of wire in and then secured it back out the way using a small cable tie. If you wanted to do a permanent fix you could cut the lead back nearer the frame and use a proper electrical crimp connector to join the two wires together then tuck it into the frame out of the way and sight.

Right, where did I leave my beer.. :giggle:
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I think we need to start a thread on this as I must have explained this at least half a dozen times now lol.

OK, so there is a safety cut out switch attached to the clutch lever that prevents you from starting the bike in gear UNLESS the clutch is pulled in. The switch is attached to the bottom of the clutch perch (the bit that holds the lever) and needs to be bridged out so that the ECU thinks the clutch is in the pulled in position permanently. How and why this stops an error code showing from a gearing change I have absolutely no idea but bikes brains are complicated these days so just go with it.
So the easiest way and less permanent way to bridge the circuit is to pull the plug out of the switch and bridge the two wires on the lead in your hand NOT the switch on the bike as others have mistakenly done. The powered wire is in the lead, not the switch. You can use a small piece of electrical wire to bridge the two terminals but a paper clip is popular. If you use something thin and flexible like a paper clip then you can apparently put the plug back in the switch holder again where it came from to keep things neat. Myself, I wrapped the end of the lead in electrical tape to hold my piece of wire in and then secured it back out the way using a small cable tie. If you wanted to do a permanent fix you could cut the lead back nearer the frame and use a proper electrical crimp connector to join the two wires together then tuck it into the frame out of the way and sight.

Right, where did I leave my beer.. :giggle:
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The draw back to deleting the switch is if someone other than you sits, fiddles, tinkers etc.... they could leave it in gear, then when start the bike before getting on it the **** thing fires up and takes off then falls down. I've had this happen twice on two different bikes. One was a friends race bike that had leaned it, with a tie down off of a truck mirror, the other my son at a very young age in my garage, fortunately it was on a rear stand.
I have never done it and I never leave a bike in gear when I'm done riding but shiet happens and if it happens to your bike and it goes down how much $ are you going to spend fixing it all?
I go as far as to remove the circuit from the clutch side controls (real easy) and keep the clutch safety switch intact on my race builds. It may seem over kill right up until your bike is on the ground broken in some manner with this message poking you in the side of the head.

This is just a warning and a preference of mine from experience, it is unlikely that it would happen but it is not worth the risk to me.
 

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15T front sprocket is easiest and cheapest to swap out but puts your axle forward in the swing arm slot. 38T rear puts it back for longer wheel base and more stability. Personal preference.
Yeah if you can get the counter shaft nut off!!! :ROFLMAO:
The draw back to deleting the switch is if someone other than you sits, fiddles, tinkers etc.... they could leave it in gear, then when start the bike before getting on it the **** thing fires up and takes off then falls down. I've had this happen twice on two different bikes. One was a friends race bike that had leaned it, with a tie down off of a truck mirror, the other my son at a very young age in my garage, fortunately it was on a rear stand.
I have never done it and I never leave a bike in gear when I'm done riding but shiet happens and if it happens to your bike and it goes down how much $ are you going to spend fixing it all?
I go as far as to remove the circuit from the clutch side controls (real easy) and keep the clutch safety switch intact on my race builds. It may seem over kill right up until your bike is on the ground broken in some manner with this message poking you in the side of the head.

This is just a warning and a preference of mine from experience, it is unlikely that it would happen but it is not worth the risk to me.
Because I can! :LOL:
 

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Yes there are many posts about this topic. I installed a 15 on the front, rode it 500 miles thinking I dodged the Check Engine Light and gear indicator loss (two dots blinking). Eventually all functions fixed itself after a long ride but Kiwi warned me it would malfunction again, which it did. So I shorted the clutch switch with a cut down paper clip. Rode about 100 normal miles, at this moment all is working fine once again. All is good on earth again except the covid crap.
By the way, 15 tooth on the front is awesome!
 

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The draw back to deleting the switch is if someone other than you sits, fiddles, tinkers etc.... they could leave it in gear, then when start the bike before getting on it the **** thing fires up and takes off then falls down.
I have a friend who owns a Zero e-moto. He says that anytime he gets off the bike he has to be very careful to ensure the main switch is OFF. After all, with e-power there's no "start the engine" process, once the switch is on the throttle is active, and there's no noise or anything that might warn off the random throttle-fiddler. A good twist of the throttle could result in a heavy bike quickly accelerating into the near distance, with the easily imagined dire results.
 

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Can someone explain what the true advantage would be? Are you trying to top out your max speed? I mean, there is nothing wrong with the engine revving at 7-8k at 80 mph. That's normal and well within operating parameters. Motorcycle engines are designed to rev at much higher rates than cars (if that is what you are concerned about).
 

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Probly more for comfort for the rider with less high rpm vibes as this is less stress for the engine at higher cruising speeds, say for longish trips. And ya get better mileage. Makes first gear longer and not so squirelly.

Once I get my Norton power package, i will decide if a gear change will be necessary. right now stock is OK for me.
 

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Can someone explain what the true advantage would be? Are you trying to top out your max speed? I mean, there is nothing wrong with the engine revving at 7-8k at 80 mph. That's normal and well within operating parameters. Motorcycle engines are designed to rev at much higher rates than cars (if that is what you are concerned about).
My FJR at 100 mph is at 5K rpm, my Z400 is @ 10 rpm. With the full Akra, K&N, and ECU flash, the Z will easily pull more gear, it takes off in 2nd gear no problemo. On long rides a lower rpm is nice. Butt, yer right, most peeps actually gear 'em down.
 

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I haven't done it yet, butt, the way I understand it, there's a safety switch at the clutch, (So you can pull in the clutch 'n start in gear?) 'n you jump at that plug to fix the problem. Why, I dunno, butt whatever?
EDIT
From @Boat in the gearing thread HERE
 

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The draw back to deleting the switch is if someone other than you sits, fiddles, tinkers etc.... they could leave it in gear, then when start the bike before getting on it the **** thing fires up and takes off then falls down.
Alright, alright. fine, I’ll work on this again, lol. It’s definitely going to require splicing into the harness.
 

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Sounds like I opened a can of worms.
So, what I did was leave the clutch safety circuit in place by removing the wires and clutch switch plug from the left hand light control unit. I do not run lights or turn signals on track bikes so the control unit is unnecessary. The safety circuit wires are separate inside the of the lights loom and can be simply removed. I have not rewired the bike or cut into the wire harness but rkturbo is the man for this department. I have changed all kinds of gearing on this bike and have not noticed any error codes and the speedometer is still working with the gear indicator working as well. Saying this means the next time I ride the problem will show up. :)
 

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Wouldn't taking the clutch switch out mean that you can only start the bike in neutral? That's how it was on my R3. I left it as on my 400 for convenience, but on the R3 I could only start it in neutral once the switch was removed, which proved to be a bit annoying in some situations. If it was in gear it wouldn't turn the starter at all, regardless of the clutch lever position. But maybe the 400 is wired differently...
 
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