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To be honest I am more excited by the introduction of bikes like the ninja 400 and that prototype 250 inline 4. These are bikes you can ride for fun in a city and still keep your licence. …
+1 Big hurray for Kawi that keep coming up with good reliable bikes for real people at an affordable price.

First, they kept making the Ninja 250 for decades when everyone else gave up the class.
Then they came up with the N400 which is a blast.
The actual ZX6R costs less than their japs competition and it's a great bike. I think the CBR600 doesn't have electronics yet.
And now the I-4 250.

Great brand.
 

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+1 Big hurray for Kawi that keep coming up with good reliable bikes for real people at an affordable price.

First, they kept making the Ninja 250 for decades when everyone else gave up the class.
Then they came up with the N400 which is a blast.
The actual ZX6R costs less than their japs competition and it's a great bike. I think the CBR600 doesn't have electronics yet.
And now the I-4 250.

Great brand.
Right the 250RR is not a prototype, them and Honda, Suzuki, Yamaha all had 250 inline 4 cylinders, and 400 inline 4 cylinders for years in the 80's and into the mid-90's. And they all were equipped with the current day top of the shelf kit (well as far as street bikes went) suspension and braking bits.
I mean heck even Honda had small displacement v-4's with inverted forks, single sided swingarms, etc...

I am glad to see Kawasaki is going to do the same, and not just another strictly budget bike they make to look like the bigger brothers to those beginner riders who would not know the difference between fully adjustable rear shocks, forks and radial, monoblock brakes or know how to use.
Granted I lack the skill and speed to fully utilize it but it sure helps me look more like I do.......lol :grin:
 

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What’s the latest with this 4 cyl 250? I am hearing that it may NOT be coming to the US. Sure would be nice if the big 4 would make 4 cyl 250s again. But that would really probably put the final nails in the coffins of the 600 class. The price of the latest greatest 1000 creeps north of 15/k makes the smaller bikes more appealing.
 

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What’s the latest with this 4 cyl 250? I am hearing that it may NOT be coming to the US. Sure would be nice if the big 4 would make 4 cyl 250s again. But that would really probably put the final nails in the coffins of the 600 class. The price of the latest greatest 1000 creeps north of 15/k makes the smaller bikes more appealing.
I've been wondering the same thing. I flicked an e-mail to Kawasaki NZ yst regarding this. Will keep you posted on their response.
 

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I've been wondering the same thing. I flicked an e-mail to Kawasaki NZ yst regarding this. Will keep you posted on their response.
Kiwi, as much as I'd like to see this bike here in the Divided States, I suspect, if/when it is, it'll be in limited quantities and expensive. I can get a Ninja H2 in several models, if I'm willing to shell out $22K-$55K US. They're available if I order one. But that's not going to happen. Nice bikes, but really a niche market for deeper pockets than mine. I have to believe, at least for the original release of these little pocket rockets, Kawasaki will be targeting that upper end niche market by offering all the bells and whistles it can think of. Certainly not near the H2's cost, but $10K US we've read about it's MSRP, is pretty comparable. With a possible neutered, less expensive, model released afterwards. But I'm just guessing. :nerd:
 

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Kiwi, as much as I'd like to see this bike here in the Divided States, I suspect, if/when it is, it'll be in limited quantities and expensive. I can get a Ninja H2 in several models, if I'm willing to shell out $22K-$55K US. They're available if I order one. But that's not going to happen. Nice bikes, but really a niche market for deeper pockets than mine. I have to believe, at least for the original release of these little pocket rockets, Kawasaki will be targeting that upper end niche market by offering all the bells and whistles it can think of. Certainly not near the H2's cost, but $10K US we've read about it's MSRP, is pretty comparable. With a possible neutered, less expensive, model released afterwards. But I'm just guessing. :nerd:
If we do get it I dont think the price will be too crazy. Two reasons: a) They probably realise that there would be very few perspective buyers who would fork out 10K for a 250cc bike despite a few bells and whistles. b) Looking at the spec sheet it's not real high tech. The frame is still steel and although it has USD forks there has been no mention of the adjustability of them, ditto rear shock. Really, apart from the 4 cylinder engine it appears to be no higher spec than the Honda CB300R which also has USD's and a radial front brake caliper.
 

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I've not seen those specs, so I'm sure you're probably dead on. But I still suspect they have something up their sleeves, especially since I'm sure, they noticed how much chatter the bike's caused during it's rumor stage.
 

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I remember reading about super sports and when the 600 class was less than 9k. 11k bought a new 1000. 13k or so bought the Busa or ZX14
Crazy at the prices now. And you don’t see the super sports out on the roads like you did in the early to mid 2000’s. Not even close.
 

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Australia misses out

I got a reply from Kawasaki Australia today:

"The 2020 Ninja ZX-25R will not be coming into Australia. The bike is not suited to the Australian market thus we won't be bringing it in."

Does not bode well for us then as we tend to follow Australia... :crying:

I've not seen those specs, so I'm sure you're probably dead on. But I still suspect they have something up their sleeves, especially since I'm sure, they noticed how much chatter the bike's caused during it's rumor stage.
Most likely only their arms. :smile_big:
 

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Maybe just available in the Asian markets?? They're certainly more receptive to the smaller CC bikes. And if there's nothing special and nothing to set this Ninja apart, then why bother going outside a proven market? My GSX250R is an awesome bike, but I've never seen another one on the road. The smaller size makes it a bit of a "red headed stepchild" everyone loves, but doesn't care to take home and nurture. :sad:
 

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I got a reply from Kawasaki Australia today:

"The 2020 Ninja ZX-25R will not be coming into Australia. The bike is not suited to the Australian market thus we won't be bringing it in."

Does not bode well for us then as we tend to follow Australia... :crying:



Most likely only their arms. :smile_big:
I guessing the same holds true for the good ‘ol US of A...

Even if they did bring it over here I doubt it would sell. I think it’s an awesome little bike and I’d love to have one myself, but out here it’s a niche market...

My little 400 does a good job of keeping me entertained though...
 

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We have a market here that is more receptive towards small models and the 300/400 class is a big seller for sure but for some reason the big brands seem to balk at bringing in the hot 250's that they cant sell at a '250cc price' like they can the GSX250R.
We also have the annoying LAMS learner licence restriction which limits new riders to a bike of less than 47 HP and perhaps the ZX-25 falls outside of that bracket.
Bit of a loss, you could start an awesome racing class around this bike. We already have one here called the Hyosung 250 cup.
 

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The question of "who's the market" really applies to bikes outside of mainstream expectations in the US. I've read this thread and wondered how a 250 four cylinder would be for daily street riding where it's better to have the torque down low. As others have indicated, it might be better for racing where it wouldn't be annoying to keep the engine at high revs.

But then again, who'd of thought that the Z150 and Grom would have become popular in the US as well.
 

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we are seeing a new trend in the US with smaller disp bikes becoming "cool" to ride. when i started riding ten years ago, i couldn't believe how many times people would ask me when i was going to get a 1000, get a real bike etc... and i was riding a gsxr 600. if it wasn't a 1000 it wasn't a cool bike. I've ridden a few 1000 cc super sports, and while they are lovely to pin the throttle in a straight line, i wouldn't want one for daily use. i am happier with the smaller displacement bikes, personally. the only complaint i have are the smaller bikes are more budget based compared to the top super sports.
 

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we are seeing a new trend in the US with smaller disp bikes becoming "cool" to ride. when i started riding ten years ago, i couldn't believe how many times people would ask me when i was going to get a 1000, get a real bike etc... and i was riding a gsxr 600. if it wasn't a 1000 it wasn't a cool bike. I've ridden a few 1000 cc super sports, and while they are lovely to pin the throttle in a straight line, i wouldn't want one for daily use. i am happier with the smaller displacement bikes, personally. the only complaint i have are the smaller bikes are more budget based compared to the top super sports.
I wonder how much credit should be given to motojournalist Ari Henning for promoting interest in smaller bikes in the US. He's written quite a number of articles saying how fun smaller bikes are to ride. Maybe his point is catching on.

The percentage of the population that rides has been slipping. I'm hoping that all of the manufacturers start to realize that we need to get more people into motorcycling. Pushing the upsell by implying that affordable bikes are not worth one's time has perhaps lead many potential riders to think it's an unaffordable hobby, and so they never learn to ride.

But among riders (and non-riders) my age, most still question why anyone would want a smaller displacement bike. The bigger is better mentality is in full swing in North Dakota and the Milwaukee suburbs. It'll probably not change until more people they know take up smaller bikes. At present, in my limited social circle, I'm an outlier as the only older rider who could afford a bigger bike but who prefers a small bike.

We also need to change the image of motorcycles again. The "You meet the nicest people on a Honda" ad campaign from decades ago successfully countered the ****'s Angels image from popular media. Now we need to convince parents that their teens aren't going to kill themselves on a supersport. Fun and safe small displacement bikes can help with that.

Edit: I just posted and saw that my reference to a certain motorcycle club was censored. I assume this was automatic via programming as I don't think a human could have read the post in the time it took from my click to when it appeared. I didn't think that particular word was naughty when used properly.
 

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I wonder how much credit should be given to motojournalist Ari Henning for promoting interest in smaller bikes in the US. He's written quite a number of articles saying how fun smaller bikes are to ride. Maybe his point is catching on.
It was pretty cool to see Ari Henning punting a CBR300 at the race track when I had one of those. I did a few track days on mine and it sowed the seed for bigger things.

Edit: I just posted and saw that my reference to a certain motorcycle club was censored. I assume this was automatic via programming as I don't think a human could have read the post in the time it took from my click to when it appeared. I didn't think that particular word was naughty when used properly.
Yep, it's an automated system which (arguably) needs it's ECU flashed to fine tune it a bit.
Standard work around is to use two 1's instead of ll ie. He11
Just like $ for S in $hit :giggle:
 

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We have a market here that is more receptive towards small models and the 300/400 class is a big seller for sure but for some reason the big brands seem to balk at bringing in the hot 250's that they cant sell at a '250cc price' like they can the GSX250R.
We also have the annoying LAMS learner licence restriction which limits new riders to a bike of less than 47 HP and perhaps the ZX-25 falls outside of that bracket.
Bit of a loss, you could start an awesome racing class around this bike. We already have one here called the Hyosung 250 cup.
Yes our Lams system, or the "Lamest arsehole murking specification" as I think is the official title, means that a non-lams 250cc is a very hard proposition for Kawasaki Australia. It is a 250cc that learners can't legally ride, immediately narrowing the potential market. Overall the motorcycle market in Australia is very soft and this is not a period that I would expect Kawasaki to introduce a model like this. To get it in the lams category they would have to do a modified version like the ninja 650 is in OZ. The fact that they already have the ninja 400 selling as well as it has in OZ, would probably also add to lack of interest in this model.

Kiwi Rider you might be alright if you really want one. Doesn't NZ have super lax grey import laws? Thanks to our benevolent Australian overlords (and now defunct automobile industry) this "backdoor" method of importing direct from Asia is impossible in the magical land of OZ. At least for a vehicle that you might want to get registered ever.

Oh well, there is a 1999 aprilla RS250 for sale on gumtree with 5,000 km on it and all for the low, low price of $17,000.:crying:
 

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Kiwi Rider you might be alright if you really want one. Doesn't NZ have super lax grey import laws? Thanks to our benevolent Australian overlords (and now defunct automobile industry) this "backdoor" method of importing direct from Asia is impossible in the magical land of OZ. At least for a vehicle that you might want to get registered ever.
Yeah it's pretty straight forward if you just want a track bike. You can buy them off sites like Goo Bike (see example below) and the Japs have some different colour options to rest of world. There's agents here who organize the details and freighting at the Japanese end. Gets a lot more involved and costly at this end though if you want to register it for the road if it's not a model that has been bought in previously by a manufacturer and passed the design regulation certification process for New Zealand.
I looked into all this two years ago when I was trying to get my hands on the Honda CBR250RR when it came out, but in the end I decided it was easier and more cost effective to just go and buy a Ninja 400. So I did.

KAWASAKI NINJA 400 | New Bike | WHITE/BLACK | ?*km | details | Japanese used Motorcycles - GooBike English
 

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There's still hope

Got this response from Kawasaki NZ this morn:

We are yet to receive any more info from KHI at this stage. What we do know is production is scheduled for late 2020. What is unknown is whether there will be a spec available for NZ. We will make an announcement when we know more.

KHI is short for Kawasaki Heavy Industries in Japan.
 

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17K RPM redline

Seems to have lost 3K RPM off the top since the last model released in 1989. Can we blame that on Euro 5 maybe? Yeah why not. :laugh:


I wonder when we get to actually hear it? Volume #27 in a years time perhaps.
 
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