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There’s much to love of Kawasaki’s latest addition to the small motorcycle lineup and Motorcycle.com has listed what they think are the top 10 features of the 2018 Ninja 400. Ryan Adams from said publication, had a chance to test ride the new Ninja 400 in Northern California for two days. One of which consists of winding backroads and the other was spend on a race track. He probably could go beyond 10 features, but for the sake of this article it was kept manageable.

Maneuverability
One doesn’t need to put much effort into turning when the bike weighs in at a light 366 pounds wet. Combined with a rigid chassis, 41mm Showa fork and KYB shock, the Ninja 400 feel stable while blasting around those corners.

Chassis
Taking design notes from the Ninja H2, Kawasaki has developed a new trellis-type frame for the Ninja 400 with emphasis put on added stability.

Dimensions
Most won’t notice at first glance, but the Ninja 400 wheelbase has shrunk by 1.4-inches and it now has a 24.7-degree rake angle.

Engine Size
Kawasaki managed to give us more a 399cc parallel-twin engine while keeping it around the same size as last year’s model. Thus their point of it being “bigger, without being bigger”.

Power Increase

Not only does the new Ninja have more power, and torque, but delivery of both is quite liner as shown by their dyno chart.

Still Entry Level

Sure, it has more power compared to the 300, but the Ninja 400 won’t overwhelm new riders thanks to its light clutch pull, light weight, and relaxed riding position.

Great For Track

With 25 lb-ft of torque coming in at 8,000 rpm and 44hp at 10,000 rpm, the Ninja 400’s high rev range was made to be opened up on track.

Slip and Assist Clutch
Clutch control is something new riders will need to get familiar with and accidental downshifts are nothing to be afraid of thanks to the slipper clutch, which prevents engine over rev.

Ergonomics

The handlebars are 15mm closer to your body and the footpegs have been shifted back a bit. Even better, the narrower seat’s padding is twice as thick for increased comfort on long rides.

Good Looks
Let’s face it, the Ninja 400 is a looker and those who aren’t familiar with the motorcycle would think it’s a larger bike.
 

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I'm curious if new owners are finding the seat to be as comfortable as early reviews have suggested. I know a couple people on here indicated that they found the seat on the 300 to be more comfortable. Perhaps it'll get better with the wear in process.
 

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'The handle bars are closer to you body' it says.

I wonder if they are higher or lower than the 300.
I've read on the Kawi specs that the seat height is the same at 780mm, but it doesn't say anything about the handlebars height.

Also, I assume that the forks being wider, clip-on's from the 250 and 300 won't fit on the 400.


The changes that I find more interesting, coming from the 300, are stiffer frame, shorter wheel base, steeper rake angle and better suspension (I hope).

I ride track and street. Don't commute or do long rides.

More torque is fine, but I like the revvy nature of the 300.
Every time I hit the rev limiter or the revs go too low and the bike won't go out of the turn, for me, it's like the bike saying 'you suck', 'go learn to ride' haha.

A torquey bike is more forgiving.
 

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'The handle bars are closer to you body' it says.

I wonder if they are higher or lower than the 300.
I've read on the Kawi specs that the seat height is the same at 780mm, but it doesn't say anything about the handlebars height.

Also, I assume that the forks being wider, clip-on's from the 250 and 300 won't fit on the 400.


The changes that I find more interesting, coming from the 300, are stiffer frame, shorter wheel base, steeper rake angle and better suspension (I hope).

I ride track and street. Don't commute or do long rides.

More torque is fine, but I like the revvy nature of the 300.
Every time I hit the rev limiter or the revs go too low and the bike won't go out of the turn, for me, it's like the bike saying 'you suck', 'go learn to ride' haha.

A torquey bike is more forgiving.
The bars are apparently slightly higher and no 250/300 clip ons won't fit.
 

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Ergonomics
The handlebars are 15mm closer to your body and the footpegs have been shifted back a bit. Even better, the narrower seat’s padding is twice as thick for increased comfort on long rides.
Wow, the footpegs are shifted back?
I know I have large feet, but they need to be shifted back QUITE a bit more. A couple of more inches would be tremendously helpful for me.
As it is I can barely get my foot between the peg and the shift lever.
 

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I'm curious if new owners are finding the seat to be as comfortable as early reviews have suggested. I know a couple people on here indicated that they found the seat on the 300 to be more comfortable. Perhaps it'll get better with the wear in process.
Lol the seat on every bike I have ever had is more comfortable then the 400... even my 250 Ninja was a pleasure to sit on.
 

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Lol the seat on every bike I have ever had is more comfortable then the 400... even my 250 Ninja was a pleasure to sit on.

I have sat on 2x4 pine boards with more give.. :sad::nerd::sad:
 
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I think it's ok riding it for max couple of hours before I get a numb bum.

The only gripe I have is that huge, ugly exhust! Why design a beautiful bike the stick that horrible thing on it?
 

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Just came back from my first night ride and the LED lighting is a very nice feature. It really lit up the road and has a nice blue/white hue...
 
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