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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, I have done many searches on the site as well as online in general. I am new to bike maintenance but I am willing to learn and do it myself. I am adjusting the chain slack for the first time and having an issue with the plate on the swingarm moving when I tighten the castle nut on the axle. It moves almost 1 to 2 mm so when tightened 1 side does not match where the other side is using the marks on the swing arm. None of the content I found online addresses this.

I know the marks aren't the most accurate, but I don't like having one side be 1 to 2 mm different - even if it is just the adjuster plate shifted slightly. Anyone running into this issue? I even tried clamping the plate to the swingarm while tightening to keep it from shifting, but it did anyway.

I don't hear any odd rubbing or squeaking noises when turning the wheel on the stand, though I have not taken it for a test ride yet.

Any advice or suggestion is appreciated, thanks everyone!
 
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The rear axle has a tendency to move when that nut is tightened. Try loosening and realigning with your swingarm marks.. like you have before. After getting the adjustment where you want it, slip a largish screwdriver (in the same direction as the axle) on top of the lower side of the chain. and roll the wheel until the screwdriver is in a bind between the chain and sprocket teeth.. not overly tight but fairly snug.. the retighten the axle nut and torque. This will usually minimize, but not altogether prevent, the axle from moving when the nut is tightened. You can also use something like a rag to run between sprocket and chain, but IMO the solid screwdriver gives less while you're tightening the nut.
 

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I think we've all had the same experience -- it is tricky to keep the floppy alignment plates pushed up against one side or the other of the axle so their indicator marks are comparable. I use a chain alignment tool as my final say. One thing that helps is keeping the chain tight when you tighten the nuts -- see 3 minutes in this video where he stuffs a rag between the chain/sprocket and turns it tight.
 

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I push the adjuster brackets forward and do my best to get them even. I've double checked with a chain tool and tape measure, all lined up perfectly.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the replies. I ended up loosening and re-tightening the axle nut -again, this time as slow as possible to minimize the plate movement. Also, stuck the rag in between the chain and sprocket, that kept things from moving around too, thanks for that!

Took it for a test ride after, seems ok. Chain looks straight, no rubbing or weird noises. Rear brake seemed as normal. Will keep an eye on it and go from here. Thanks everyone!
 

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Get the adjusters set up equally. Yes the marks in the swingarm aren't perfect but for 99% of us (myself included) they're good enough. A rag or sprocket jammer is the solution. Use the chain tension to hold the axle blocks against the stops. Tighten the axle nut enough so that it's not loose and kinda stays put by itself, but not so tight that it's hard to move.

I personally use the handle of a 10mm wrench as a "jammer". Rotate the wheel backwards with the jammer between the sprocket and the chain. Pull until it's snug and then while holding the rotation tighten up the nut. No movement this way.
 
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