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Yes, I've had experience with this scenario a couple of times but not for a long time.
Probably because this happened when I was younger and less risk adverse I just left the screw (and a nail once) in and it kept the hole sealed until I replaced the tyre when it was worn out thousands of km's later.
I'm not saying this is the best approach because from a safety point of view it obviously isn't. But, it is a feasible option esp as the tyre is near new and they cost $$ to replace.
Your call.
 

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If it's definitely not leaking any air, I probably would not mess with it and not try to repair it and do what Kiwi Rider did and replace the tire later.

Since I'm still less risk adverse, I would eventually replace for a new tire and maybe a good excuse to try a different tire.
 
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I would plug it. I have rode with plugs in tires, well over 100mph and a plug is def safer than a nail or screw. Either replace the tire, or plug it. If you are still worried you can take the rim off the bike and take it to a local bike shop to get it patched from the inside.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Good luck. Please let us know how it goes after a while.
I did plug the tire. I tried with one, but unfortunately didn't work. I was loosing air. I took the plug out and I decided I will try again, if it didn't work I would replace the tire. Instead of putting only 1 plug I put 2 (It was hard AF to stick them in the hole)
I put 35 psi in the rear tire, 100 ml later - no air leaks. Hope it's gonna last!
 

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When I was an ASE master technician working on cars professionally, I plugged tires all the time. Customers usually opted for a $10 fix rather than paying to have the tire removed and patched internally. I've plugged hundreds of tires, including on my own cars, trucks and motorcycles, and never had an issue running a plugged tire until worn out. On the other hand, you said you had to use two plugs to get it to seal. I would not trust that on a motorcycle tire. One tire losing pressure is just too critical. If the hole was big enough to require two plugs, better to replace the tire, for your own safety and the safety of those driving near you.

I started carrying a tire plug kit that has plugs meant for motorcycle tires. They're shaped like a round arrow, to provide that much more resistance to popping out. It's called the pocket tire plugger and is sold on revzilla and probably most other online moto stores. Still haven't had to use it though. I just mounted a new rear tire on my guzzi, so I'm sure I'll get a nail soon. It never fails to happen.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
When I was an ASE master technician working on cars professionally, I plugged tires all the time. Customers usually opted for a $10 fix rather than paying to have the tire removed and patched internally. I've plugged hundreds of tires, including on my own cars, trucks and motorcycles, and never had an issue running a plugged tire until worn out. On the other hand, you said you had to use two plugs to get it to seal. I would not trust that on a motorcycle tire. One tire losing pressure is just too critical. If the hole was big enough to require two plugs, better to replace the tire, for your own safety and the safety of those driving near you.

I started carrying a tire plug kit that has plugs meant for motorcycle tires. They're shaped like a round arrow, to provide that much more resistance to popping out. It's called the pocket tire plugger and is sold on revzilla and probably most other online moto stores. Still haven't had to use it though. I just mounted a new rear tire on my guzzi, so I'm sure I'll get a nail soon. It never fails to happen.
Thanks for your reply, it's nice to hear advice from someone with experience!
Since I plugged the tire I put 35 psi. 120 mls later no psi lost. The plug was visible at first now it just blended with the tire and it's hard to see it. Looks stable for now. It was really hard to put the plugs in the hole so I think that way it's even more stable.
I may even put 2 plugs anytime from now on, just for extra protection against air leaking.
 

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I did not encounter any issues in plugging tires over the years and running them until they are worn out.

Had to plug my tire after owning this bike for 2 weeks and my latest puncture is not straight in but at an angle pointed towards the sidewall but that was like 3000kms ago. As long as theres no leak and damage to the sidewall I guess everything is good to go.
 

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If the hole was big enough to require two plugs, better to replace the tire, for your own safety and the safety of those driving near you.
It also depends on the diameter of the plugs he used. I've come across dozens of different thicknesses. My last kit had five different sizes in it, for different tyre types and puncture sizes.
 

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I did plug the tire. I tried with one, but unfortunately didn't work. I was loosing air. I took the plug out and I decided I will try again, if it didn't work I would replace the tire. Instead of putting only 1 plug I put 2 (It was hard AF to stick them in the hole)
I put 35 psi in the rear tire, 100 ml later - no air leaks. Hope it's gonna last!
That's what you do, I have also had lots of luck with mudders and moto tire plugs. Just clean, ream, install 1-2 plug snakes so there's no leaks and cut off the excess. Keep an eye on it and run it till it needs replaced or starts leaking again.
 

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These style plugs will always leak. Take the wheel off and take it to a shop to patch it internally. It won't cost more than 25-30 bucks, is safer and will actually last. I work in tires every day and see these rope plugs come in all the time.
 
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