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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After less than a week I was very close to 1000 km so I brought it in for service. When I bought the bike I was told it was a 1-h job - just changing filters and oil, and re-torquing any bolts. I ended up spending $275 (Canadian, including tax).

Does that sound about right ? From the description I expected the cost to be much less.
 

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After less than a week I was very close to 1000 km so I brought it in for service. When I bought the bike I was told it was a 1-h job - just changing filters and oil, and re-torquing any bolts. I ended up spending $275 (Canadian, including tax).

Does that sound about right ? From the description I expected the cost to be much less.
Dang, that seems high.......whats their labor? $100 an hour.......still not sure how changing oil and filter would be another $175........filter would be $10 tops I would think and even 2 or 3 quarts of Amsoil at super high retail prices of $20 ea. would only be like $70.

Did they give you a breakdown of the service performed?

I know when I was mechanic the service manager/advisor, whatever they call them these days gave them a copy of my notes, parts list, fluids, etc. as I wrote everything down I did or did not do.
 

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It costs $0 on my bike (minus oil and filter cost),... I do it myself. Really super simple maintenance that you can do in well under an hour. Even if you don't already have the tools, you can buy everything you need for $50 and then at least have a set of tools for other projects as well.

Nothing wrong with paying to service your bike but really you just paid $200 extra to not get oil on your fingers.
 

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Dealer here said 180 Canadian. After that Kawi won't make any noise if you do it all your self. The first maint on record by a dealer goes a long way if you actually run into warranty issues. I will pay the first and do the rest myself since they threw in 2 years warrantly may as well.
 

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I don't remember how much I paid for the first service but in mind it was maybe over 100$ CAN, not 200$. If I will find the receipt I will update the thread.

Sure you can do stuff yourself but if you're new to riding and have no mechanical experience it is better to play it by the book and start wrenching slowly. You can look at how to clean and lube the chain, change the oil yourself. These are pretty easy things, just do one at a time until you get the hang of it. Then start doing more maintenance. Me, I had to ask my brother to help me the first time for adjusting the chain. Now I got it. If you have someone to help you out, it is worth using their experience, it will save you quite a bit of effort and hassle.
 

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I just looked at my receipt for my first service on the Z400. It was $205 down here in Northern California. Parts were only $37 for Oil Filter, Gasket, and Oil. Labor was $165...IDK how many hours that is, but I want to say around 1.5, which would mean it's around $125 an hour. The other notes were just checking/adjusting idle speed, replace oil/filter, inspected braking system, inspected cooling system and topped off. Lubed and adjusted cables. Inspected steering, suspension and wheel bearings. Cleaned, lubed and adjusted chains, tested lighting and switched. Charged and tested battery.
 

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After less than a week I was very close to 1000 km so I brought it in for service. When I bought the bike I was told it was a 1-h job - just changing filters and oil, and re-torquing any bolts. I ended up spending $275 (Canadian, including tax).

Does that sound about right ? From the description I expected the cost to be much less.
By the book the first service is fairly detailed. More than just an oil/filter drop that people like to suggest. Parts wise it would mostly be filter/oil, but labour costs a bit.

Did they give you an invoice? Sharing that is probably useful if you want opinions on being overcharged / not.
 

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My dealer I bought my z400 from mentioned that the first 1000km service is mostly spent checking over the whole bike more so than making changes. They said specifically they change out the oil and filter on the bike as these are specific for the run in period, but the rest of the service is making sure nothing has come loose or moved around. There is lots of white marker/paint dots around all sorts of areas. These mark where they were during the initial build and if any of them have moved over the first 1000km they would tighten and investigate other areas that could have also moved.

For me, I was told that the first 1000km service is a fixed cost of $199 AUD, and the 6000km general services are around $300 AUD, with the 24000km major services to expect about double that.

For me personally, as I bought the bike brand new with finance, and it has 24 months factory warranty, I plan to do whatever servicing during those 2 years with the dealer and just suck up the cost. But as soon as the factory warranty runs out, I will definitely be transitioning to doing services myself, along with starting the modification process :D
 

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Sounds kinda steep ta me, but if yer a new rider or don't have the time 'n space to wrench, what r ya gonna do?
1st service is basically a glorified oil/filter change; $35 in parts?
Every rider should keep an eye on their tyre pressures, 'n cable slack. (I trust my inbred self better than most stealerships anyways.)
 

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I totally agree. It's a dealers way of profiting heavily on Kawi's recommendations. if you gonna ride you gotta learn to take care of your bike

🐉
 

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1st service is basically a glorified oil/filter change; $35 in parts?
By the book it's this (1/(06) column):
17787

17788


So yeah, in parts it's generally "oil/filter". Potentially some brake fluid/chain lube if they're being nice. In checks (i.e. labour) they are expected to perform it's fairly hefty compared to say the 6000km service. Labour is where the real cost comes in, and dealer prices for labour tend to be fairly high. I don't think it would be that much of a stretch to call it 1.5-2 hours of labour.

For the price OP paid I'd expect a by the book service. If it was just an oil/filter change like others have suggested then it's a rip off.
Some people get discounted first services from their dealer, which skews the price range people see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Thanks everyone for all your input. I found the work order. It's strange, they didn't even enter things like VIN #, plate # or odometer reading which I would have expected for warranty purposes, and it doesn't even show the date. I'll dig out my credit card receipt and staple it to the work order for my records, in case I need to make a warranty claim and prove the work was actually done on my bike.

I forgot to mention that I did ask them to check for any damage or leaks when my sister's friend knocked the bike over, and to tighten the mirrors. I assumed that both were negligible amounts of work, but maybe checking for leaks would have taken more ?

Anyways, they charged me for 1.5h labor at just about $100/h. A few posts above suggested that both numbers might be around right.

The largest part of the parts subtotal was 3L of synthetic oil, about $57 total. I know that the issue of when to run synthetic oil is much debated, but I'm not sure what Kawasaki recommends or not. If Kawasaki recommends synthetic oil from the start, then I guess all is well. The only other parts were a filter and a gasket plus $5 for "shop supplies".

The shop seems to do a pretty terrible job of record keeping, but seems like the time and labor are reasonable. Unlike @Stevo2614 's dealer, mine didn't itemize what they did except to say "Complete 1st service" and "Test OK".

Going forward, although I do not have much experience wrenching on things bigger than a chainsaw, I would like to do as much of the routine maintenance as possible both to save money and learn more about the bike. I know I can do the simple things like checking tire pressure, replacing spark plugs and changing oil and filters. I can clean and lube the chain. I'll find a shop manual and evaluate what else I can do myself. Wherever I need to document work being properly done for warranty purposes though, I'll probably let the dealer do the work.

Thank you everyone !!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I just looked at the service schedule @dbrain posted. I put about 1300 km on the bike in 9 days of ownership. I know this is likely to go down as the novelty wears off and because I have moved the bike to the cottage where I will only be riding on weekends.

Even so, it's clear that it will quickly become expensive if I don't learn how to do some things myself. I just want to make sure I don't jeopardize my warranty. Thanks all again !
 

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I just looked at the service schedule @dbrain posted. I put about 1300 km on the bike in 9 days of ownership. I know this is likely to go down as the novelty wears off and because I have moved the bike to the cottage where I will only be riding on weekends.

Even so, it's clear that it will quickly become expensive if I don't learn how to do some things myself. I just want to make sure I don't jeopardize my warranty. Thanks all again !
In no way does doing maintenance yourself jeopardize the warranty. This is a common myth that comes up on this forum. Kawasaki is very clear on this, doing your own maintenance does not void the warranty.

Frequently Asked Questions| Kawasaki Owners Center
 

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Even so, it's clear that it will quickly become expensive if I don't learn how to do some things myself. I just want to make sure I don't jeopardize my warranty. Thanks all again !
The Service Manual (not the Owner's Manual that comes with the bike) that you can buy from the dealer and depending on your exact model, even online, it is well worth its weight in gold, so to speak. It has various maintenance procedures, problem investigations protocols and it gives you the details on how to dissemble and reassemble the various subsystems of the bike.

The most basic maintenance you can learn online but the IMO the manual is worth it because as you start doing things yourself, you may have questions about very particular things that are hard to find online.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The Service Manual (not the Owner's Manual that comes with the bike) that you can buy from the dealer and depending on your exact model, even online, it is well worth its weight in gold, so to speak.
I'm going to have to buy myself one. I've only really wrenched on old broken down chainsaws, and you can't buy those manuals from dealers or companies. So, I usually would download ones that people had scanned and shared, but I expect the manual for the Z is significantly larger than a chainsaw manual would be.
 

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I'm going to have to buy myself one. I've only really wrenched on old broken down chainsaws, and you can't buy those manuals from dealers or companies. So, I usually would download ones that people had scanned and shared, but I expect the manual for the Z is significantly larger than a chainsaw manual would be.
If you can tear down and reassemble a chainsaw without too many pieces left over.. your Z will be a breeze. Parts is parts.
 
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