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Discussion Starter #1
There seems to be an anomaly with the listed engine outputs on the Kawasaki sites.
Australia, NZ and the UK list the output at 33.4kW (45PS) but Canada lists it at 36kW (49PS)
The power output is not listed on the Kawasaki USA website but a member of the Ninja 300 forum found this NHTSA document which also lists it at 36kW:
https://vpic.nhtsa.dot.gov/mid/home/displayfile/39598

So... Are the North American models more powerful or is it a typo?
If they do indeed have 4 more HP then how has this been achieved? My guess would be it's through the ECU which would be good because then you would be able to swap your low power one for a high power one.
 

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There seems to be an anomaly with the listed engine outputs on the Kawasaki sites.
Australia, NZ and the UK list the output at 33.4kW (45PS) but Canada lists it at 36kW (49PS)
The power output is not listed on the Kawasaki USA website but a member of the Ninja 300 forum found this NHTSA document which also lists it at 36kW:
https://vpic.nhtsa.dot.gov/mid/home/displayfile/39598

So... Are the North American models more powerful or is it a typo?
If they do indeed have 4 more HP then how has this been achieved? My guess would be it's through the ECU which would be good because then you would be able to swap your low power one for a high power one.
My guess, if this is actually true, is that it would be a difference in tune. I’m not sure about Canada but we aren’t as strict on emissions and most manufacturers will tune their engines to run a little toward the lean side to meet Euro standards? I admit that I’m not very knowledgeable on this topic so feel free to correct me or kick me out all together. :rolleyes:
 

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I agree with Rm1sner, that if there is indeed a difference, it has to do with Euro standard for emissions; and maybe to meet learner class restrictions as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I agree with Rm1sner, that if there is indeed a difference, it has to do with Euro standard for emissions; and maybe to meet learner class restrictions as well.
Yeah I wondered about the learner class restrictions too. In the UK the A2 learner licence HP limit is 35kW (46.6 HP) so maybe they did detune it to meet this requirement.

In Australasia we have LAMS (Learner Approved Motorcycle Scheme) where the bike can only be up to 660cc and not have a power to weight ratio of more than 150kW/tonne where an allowance of 90kg is made for the rider with helmet and gear on.
According to my (possibly incorrect!) calculations even at 36kW the Ninja 400 meets this criteria.
36 divided by 258kg (168 + 90) x 1000 = 139.53 kW/tonne
 

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Probably tuned a bit lower than what the LAMS allows just to be on the safe side?
But I can't imagine Kawasaki going through the effort of tuning the U.S. model differently than Canada because there are no restrictions that I know of in the States.
 

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Probably tuned a bit lower than what the LAMS allows just to be on the safe side?
But I can't imagine Kawasaki going through the effort of tuning the U.S. model differently than Canada because there are no restrictions that I know of in the States.
There may be more restrictions in California.....
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Wow that 400 looks awesome, would love to see/hear it on the track. Thanks for sharing that Instagram account, ill be sure to follow what they put out over the next few days. Any ideas on the changes to performance? I see some people are suggesting that the only unrestricted ECU is found in the Canadian model.
US as well. 36kW vs 33.4kW which is about three and a half HP diff.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
the us model is also restricted, its only the Canadian model that is not
AKAIK the US model is not restricted. What would be their reasoning be to as there's no learner licence restrictions to meet?

If you have a look at the document I provided a link to in my opening post you will see the power figure for the Ninja 400 is listed at 36kW.

I'm just trying to keep info accurate, not wanting to be 'right' :D
 

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AKAIK the US model is not restricted. What would be their reasoning be to as there's no learner licence restrictions to meet?

If you have a look at the document I provided a link to in my opening post you will see the power figure for the Ninja 400 is listed at 36kW.

I'm just trying to keep info accurate, not wanting to be 'right' :D
You are missing a critical piece of information here: Canada got a FAST RED colour! :grin:
 

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Anyone have an idea why certain regions have ECU limited models and others do not? Luckily for me it looks like Canada is getting the unrestricted, but it's upsetting that not everyone will be getting the same power output.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Anyone have an idea why certain regions have ECU limited models and others do not? Luckily for me it looks like Canada is getting the unrestricted, but it's upsetting that not everyone will be getting the same power output.
It's so the bike sneaks into the learner licence category for new riders to buy. The A2 licence upper limit in the UK is 35kW (46.9 HP) and the LAMS (Learner Approved Motorcycle Scheme) category in Australia and NZ states the bike can have a power to weight ratio of no more than 150KW per tonne.
There's restrictions in European countries too but I'm not up on the details.
So your lucky to live where you do! :grin:
 

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It's so the bike sneaks into the learner licence category for new riders to buy. The A2 licence upper limit in the UK is 35kW (46.9 HP) and the LAMS (Learner Approved Motorcycle Scheme) category in Australia and NZ states the bike can have a power to weight ratio of no more than 150KW per tonne.
There's restrictions in European countries too but I'm not up on the details.
So your lucky to live where you do! :grin:
Yeh exactly, that being said, "full exhaust system = estimate +5 hp" "ECU reflash and retune for new exhaust and unrestrict = estimate +4hp" swap battery, levers, tail tidy, exhaust weight save = 166kgs full fuel to 155kgs which means at half a tank 148kgs which means 53-54 hp converted to kw = 40.02 now that means LAMS power to weight numbers are no 40.02 divided by bike wight and rider weight "in my case a total of 225" multiplied by 1000 = 178 kw per ton which is WELL over the 150 learner limit, no if we where to shed more weight of the bike aka carbon bits and loose another 10kgs it would be 186.13 which is just insane
 

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I just read the manual and it confirms that thailand and phillipines have full 36kw aka 49hp versions of the ninja 400 while australia has 33.4kw :/ is it a ecu flash? because under weight they are pre much same so must be a ecu difference of something in the exhaust system
 

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I just read the manual and it confirms that thailand and phillipines have full 36kw aka 49hp versions of the ninja 400 while australia has 33.4kw :/ is it a ecu flash? because under weight they are pre much same so must be a ecu difference of something in the exhaust system
I’d assume it’s a tuning difference. That’s the easiest and most cost effective way to restrict power for different markets.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
I'm hoping its all in the ECU so a re-flash should do the trick.

Perth owners: A mate of mine got his MT-07 ECU re-flashed at ECU West down down Port Kennedy and was pleased with the results.
 

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Those who wonder about the difference in power output might read the link about fuel quality: https://www.motormag.com.au/news/1707/honda-civic-type-r-detuned-on-aussie-fuel
Note:
"Aussies have another reason to blame the heat.
Honda has detuned the incoming Civic Type R for Australian conditions thanks to our hot weather and poor fuel quality.
The new Civic Type R’s engine has upgraded its VTEC system, ECU system, and exhaust for a total of 235kW, or an extra 7kW above the succeeded 2015 car.
However, while European and Japanese models score 235kW our cars will instead land with a 228kW spec engine, an output in line with the previous model.
Honda’s Yuji Matsumochi, assistant lead project engineer, was on hand at the car’s launch in Dresden to explain more on the topic. “Japan has high octane RON gasoline in the market.”
“This market, Europe [has] RON 98, so super premium gasoline,” he continued.
“And Japan over 98 to 100 RON. This is very pure high octane gasoline. So then these markets we proposed 320 PS. Australia has RON 95, so we produce 310 PS.”
While locally sold engines will be identical to overseas versions, Yuji reveals limiting boost and fuel flow have been the way to slightly blunt power.
The reasons stem from reliability, something Honda prides itself on. “So we have good guarantee into the market 310PS in your countries is better,” Yuji said.
However, we’ve been told by Honda Oz customers who juice their cars with premium Aussie fuel can expect some performance increase.
Regardless of what fuel is used, Aussie Civic Type Rs will deliver the overseas model’s full 400Nm from 2500rpm to 4500rpm.
The all-important 0-100km/h sprint hasn’t been tarnished, either, claimed to still take 5.7sec.
The detuned Civic Type R will be also be sold in Thailand which, like us, suffers from hot weather and doesn’t enjoy premium fuel availability like Europe, USA or Japan.
Honda couldn’t confirm whether Middle Eastern markets receive a detuned power figure or the outputs in line with Europe.
The Civic Type R isn’t the only one to play it safe. The Volkswagen Group wound back power in the Audi S3 and VW Golf R from 220kW to 210kW for similar reasons."
The quality of fuel is the highest in Japan and Europe, then we see US and some time after that Asia, where it looks like, that also in Malaysia the quality looks to be real good.
This might give some idea where to look for - it all starts with fuel and its quality.
 

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Has this been nailed down yet as to why Canada has over 3 1/2 more HP?. As simple as an ECU reflash? If so who is doing this in America?.
 
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