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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi,

I am the proud owner of a 2018 ninja 400 ABS. Have had it for two weeks and love the bike so far! Picked it up rather late in the season so already thinking about heated gear. Has anyone hooked up the bike for heated gear. Any info on stator output? What can the ninja handle in terms of electric output?

Thanks.

Ps. Wasn’t sure whether I post in gear or technical, but decided to go with gear.
 

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The N400's alternator is three-phase AC.

A maximum output of 14.0 V - 21.0 A @5000 r/min (rpm).

I ordered the Oxford Heaterz grips (sports version EL692Z) a while back, and a pair of Moose hand guards (for wind protection). Can't give you a review cause it's not installed yet. Though the grips as a pair will draw an average of 3.6 amps, dependent on the 5 heat settings. It'll be the first time installing these puppies, so should be fun. Look for my DIY soon.
 

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I'm a four season rider in Kentucky, and routinely ride below freezing. I've ridden in temperatures as low as 10° f. very comfortably. I have heated grips (Oxford), heated gloves, heated jacket liner, heated pants liner, heated socks, and heated insoles! It's close too 200 watts (15 amps), and way too much for the Ninja 400! My Ninja 1000 handles it as long as I pay attention to my volt meter, and don't let the bike idle too much.

For the Ninja 400 I would definitely recommend heated grips, and heated gloves. Your hands are going to be the weakest link by far! I've had great luck using my Alpine Stars water proof jacket with it's thermal liner and a cold weather base layer. I have the same setup with water proof pants with thermal liner and they are good down into the 20's even on rides several hours long. Your boots with be the next weak point.

For my Ninja 400 I plan on using heated 7.2 volt gloves with built in batteries instead of running them off the bike power. This eliminates the bike wiring issues and hassles. If you plan on trying to run more heated gear than just the heated grips I would highly recommend installing a volt meter. Anything above 12.7 volts you are OK, anything below and your battery is being depleted. Keep those Rev's up, and be prepared for lower gas millage.

Looking at the alternator output, and the fact that fuel injection, ABS and lighting use quite a bit of power, I would say it looks like you only have 50-80 watts safely available. This is fine for heated grips, still OK to add heated gloves, but not enough left for a heated vest or jacket liner. But that's just fine with the right gear and thermal liners, and 7.2 volt heated gear to supplement.

Also remember to rinse the bike well after traveling on salted roads, it will quickly show corrosion where Kawasaki skimps on the quality of coatings...

I do love riding in the winter! The views with bare trees can be quite exhilarating, and even has advantages visibility wise. People think you are even more nuts, and less motorcycle to wave at (just kidding).

I find it challenging, beautiful, and dangerous. Just like always!
 

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The N400's alternator is three-phase AC.

A maximum output of 14.0 V - 21.0 A @5000 r/min (rpm).

I ordered the Oxford Heaterz grips (sports version EL692Z) a while back, and a pair of Moose hand guards (for wind protection). Can't give you a review cause it's not installed yet. Though the grips as a pair will draw an average of 3.6 amps, dependent on the 5 heat settings. It'll be the first time installing these puppies, so should be fun. Look for my DIY soon.
Got my Ninja this month and plan on getting the Oxford Heated grips installed along with the 600 mile check-up. My weakest link in cold weather riding is my hands. From my research and watching reviews I'm hoping the Oxford grips will extend my riding seasons to late Fall and even early Winter.

Thanks for mentioning hand guards for wind protection. I got to do some research on finding a pair that will fit and hopefully look good on the Ninja.
 

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Oxford Heaterz Install and Initial Review

I installed the Oxford Heaterz Sports version in order to extend my riding season. In conjunction with Barkbusters Storm hand guards for more wind reduction. The instruction manual that comes with the grips is extremely thorough, so I won't get into the details of the installation. Though I will add some notes that is specific for the N400 and the wire routing.

Tools needed: sharp knife/razor, 600 grit sandpaper, contact cement glue, baggy of zip ties (you'll need a lot), small L-bracket, spare nut and bolt.

Mounting the Controller on the left side handlebar required an additional small L-bracket I had lying around (find it at home depot), I really didn't want to bend the bracket that comes with the grips as to distort or fatigue the thin metal. IMG_20181016_151842.jpg

I used a knife to cut the stock grips off. Using the 600 grit sandpaper, I sanded off the residual grip glue on the left handlebar. Manual states to do a dry insert before adding the glue. You gotta work fast with super glue as it sets quickly, so I went with contact cement on the left side grip as it was very snug; giving me more time to insert the grip. I cut off the trim piece at the end of the grips to give slight additional clearance for the bar ends.

The most difficult part of the install is routing the wire loom, everything else is plug n play. The manual states to route the grip's wiring loom away from the bike's wiring looms as it MAY cause electrical interference. So heeding this warning, I chose to route the wire loom through the right side of the bike, where there are fewer electronics and wires.

The system connects directly to the battery. But I decided to connect it to my battery tender harness instead. Soldered it to an SAE connector for easier removal in the summer months. Of course you could wire it to a relay or an inline switch, but it has a smart controller so it automatically turns off when you forget to.

Initial impressions: Riding to work at 4 am at 32 degrees F , these are a godsend.
With 5 heat settings it gets nice and toasty at level 3. Too hot at level 4 and 5.
 

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I’m a year long rider. While I haven’t used heated gear on my ninja 400, I do use it on other bikes. Skip the heated gloves and grips. They are only going to help you in chilly weather. Get a nice heated jacket liner. Gerbings is what I typically go with. They heat up to 135F. The cheaper liners heat up to about 110F. If you can heat your core and arms, it will pump warm blood to your extremities. Your hands will take care of themselves.

A jacket draws about 7amps by itself. You can augment it with some battery heated gloves but those by themselves are not very good when the temp dumps below low 40s.


My humble opinion of course
 

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The N400's alternator is three-phase AC.

A maximum output of 14.0 V - 21.0 A @5000 r/min (rpm).

I ordered the Oxford Heaterz grips (sports version EL692Z) a while back, and a pair of Moose hand guards (for wind protection). Can't give you a review cause it's not installed yet. Though the grips as a pair will draw an average of 3.6 amps, dependent on the 5 heat settings. It'll be the first time installing these puppies, so should be fun. Look for my DIY soon.
Wow, that's a pretty low output alternator. Your figures give a power output of almost 300 watts. My Honda cbr 500r has a 500 watt alternator and my previous bike, a Ninja 650 had a 350 watt alternator. That was barely enough to power my heated vest and heated grips.
 

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Wow, that's a pretty low output alternator. Your figures give a power output of almost 300 watts. My Honda cbr 500r has a 500 watt alternator and my previous bike, a Ninja 650 had a 350 watt alternator. That was barely enough to power my heated vest and heated grips.
IKR, wanting to add auxiliary lighting on, probly have to scrap that plan.
 

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Got my Ninja this month and plan on getting the Oxford Heated grips installed along with the 600 mile check-up. My weakest link in cold weather riding is my hands. From my research and watching reviews I'm hoping the Oxford grips will extend my riding seasons to late Fall and even early Winter.

Thanks for mentioning hand guards for wind protection. I got to do some research on finding a pair that will fit and hopefully look good on the Ninja.

Here are some pics of my Oxford heated grips.

I got the sport touring models. Tried them out today and was happy with the results. Granted it was cloudy and only around 60 degrees they helped keep the chill out of my hands. BTW, I was wearing perforated summer gloves and the heat setting was on low. Also the grips are comfortable and help dampen vibration. Looking forward to testing them in high 40 or low 50 degree weather soon.
 

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Wow, that's a pretty low output alternator. Your figures give a power output of almost 300 watts. My Honda cbr 500r has a 500 watt alternator and my previous bike, a Ninja 650 had a 350 watt alternator. That was barely enough to power my heated vest and heated grips.
I wish we knew more about the available power. I'll do some tests once I get a voltmeter installed on my 400. I've got plenty of electric gear to use for tests. I'm sure Heated Grips should be OK, but something like a 70 watt Jacket may be a problem if you don't carefully monitor your voltage.

I did see this in the Owner's Manual, Page 79 (US English):

NOTICE
This accessory circuit has 5 A fuse for the connectors. Always install a fuse 5 A or less for the circuit. Do not connect more than 25 W of load to this accessory circuit or the battery may become discharged, even with the engine running.

A 5 A fuse would be good for 60 watts at 12 v. So I take it Kawasaki is telling us we have about 25 W available at Idle speed. The alternator needs at least 5000 rpm to get near rated output, so we have some headroom IF we keep an eye on the voltage. Remember, with the engine running about 12.7 v is the middle ground, not charging or discharging the battery. Below 12.7 v and you are discharging your battery. Above 12.7 and you are charging.

Winter riding is no time to get stranded, keep an eye on that voltage if you are using any electric gear!
 

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I wish we knew more about the available power. I'll do some tests once I get a voltmeter installed on my 400. I've got plenty of electric gear to use for tests. I'm sure Heated Grips should be OK, but something like a 70 watt Jacket may be a problem if you don't carefully monitor your voltage.

I did see this in the Owner's Manual, Page 79 (US English):

NOTICE
This accessory circuit has 5 A fuse for the connectors. Always install a fuse 5 A or less for the circuit. Do not connect more than 25 W of load to this accessory circuit or the battery may become discharged, even with the engine running.

A 5 A fuse would be good for 60 watts at 12 v. So I take it Kawasaki is telling us we have about 25 W available at Idle speed. The alternator needs at least 5000 rpm to get near rated output, so we have some headroom IF we keep an eye on the voltage. Remember, with the engine running about 12.7 v is the middle ground, not charging or discharging the battery. Below 12.7 v and you are discharging your battery. Above 12.7 and you are charging.

Winter riding is no time to get stranded, keep an eye on that voltage if you are using any electric gear!
Yeah, I plan on installing a Koso mini 3 amp/voltmeter gauge. They're not cheap but they give you both readouts.

https://kosonorthamerica.com/shop/motorcycle-mx/mini-3-amp-volt/


Manufacturers should put a proper volt/amp meter on their vehicles. They do, but it's just a dummy light and usually it's too late where your battery or charging system is cooked. At least with a gauge you're seeing real time volt/amp info.

On a side note: I will stress the importance of a volt or amp meter gauge for vehicles. Case in point: I have a cheap flea-bay voltmeter in my car and it has saved my bacon. A few months ago I was in my car, cruising on the expressway with heavy traffic. I then noticed my voltage was steadily dropping from 14.4 V, I was kinda panicking so I decided to exit the expressway, luckily I was close to home and I took the side roads on my way home. Meanwhile, the voltage was slowly dropping to as low as 9.5 volts. I made it home, did some tests, charged the battery, and found out my alternator took a $hit. Needless to say, I replaced the alternator and battery (it was 5 years old), now all is good.

P.s. Anybody bump start the N400? And did anyone jump start the N400 with a car battery? Probably too early to ask.

.
 

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Anybody bump start the N400? And did anyone jump start the N400 with a car battery? Probably too early to ask.

Fuel Injected bikes can sometimes be bump started with a fully charged battery after the fuel pump gets things up to pressure.

Not much chance of bump starting with a compromised battery, and that's just when you would need it to work!

Jump starting with a car should work fine as long as the battery and alternator are in good enough shape to let it keep running after the jumping battery is disconnected.
 

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Heated Jacket! And a thermostat! I just put in my aerostich thermostat for zero to burning inside my full heated jacket. (not quite burning, but the jacket does get deliciously hot!) Its the little things that make the ride more enjoyable. Here on the west coast, the Pacific loves to spread the chill around. A couple small holes in the upper fairing makes for a perfectly convenient dial it up or down placement of the knob and red level blinker. I included mounting a great dual usb outlet with volt meter, thanks to other post recommendations. See the other writeup for that.

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The mounting

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Rider view, easy to reach down and adjust

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The jacket connector just pokes out from in front of the left side of the rider seat.

I monitor the volts from the nicely aluminum trimmed dual fast charge usb outlet. Jacket on full, and two large phones plugged in, drops to roughly 13v from a running 14.4’ish. The voltage shows if open or not.
(image shows volts with key turned, not started)
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