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Dont have such thin skin. I highly doubt this is your first foray into interweb forums. Sarcasm doesnt always show through text. NinjaBraap is 100% correct about pumping the brakes. In essence you are in the troubleshooting phase of your issue still and not in the repair this particular problem phase. In terms of troubleshooting the K.I.S.S. method should be employed first and foremost. (Keep it simple stupid). Verify things that are quick and easy that will help narrow down the issue. In this case, a leakdown check is the way.

Now, None of us know what your background in maintenance is so we dont have any idea if this type of work is going to be too much for you. Because this can very easily turn into a pile of parts on the garage floor that ends up on craigslist because its beyond a particular persons skill level.

Do you have a service manual?
Are you mechanically proficient?
 

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Good advice here. Sadly when working at a dealership I have seen more than one basket case. One in particular sticks in my mind, a Suzuki 400 twin, customer brought in in boxes, after questioning the reason customer disassembled the engine was for classic plugged carb pilot jets. A compression test can identify low compression and with oil identify worn rings. A leak down test can pinpoint a problem down to the individual failed component. A compression test combined with a leak down test can identify a bent rod. Much diagnostic information before any disassembly is started.
 

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2018 Kawasaki Ninja 400
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Good advice here. Sadly when working at a dealership I have seen more than one basket case. One in particular sticks in my mind, a Suzuki 400 twin, customer brought in in boxes, after questioning the reason customer disassembled the engine was for classic plugged carb pilot jets. A compression test can identify low compression and with oil identify worn rings. A leak down test can pinpoint a problem down to the individual failed component. A compression test combined with a leak down test can identify a bent rod. Much diagnostic information before any disassembly is started.
Exactly, as a mechanic who's worked for dealerships, contracted out, and worked on my own I've had to fix not just other peoples mistakes, but even other shops and even major dealerships (Del Amo especially for anyone in SoCal). Disassembly of an engine should be the last thing you want to ever do, and extensive diagnoses (usually clearly lined out in the service manual mind you) comes long before any disassembly.
 
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