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Hey what's up guys! Let's say you're cruising in 6th gear and you're coming to a stop. Do you just pull the clutch lever in and shift down all the way to first or down shift one gear at a time by pulling in the clutch lever in then letting go then pulling in until you reach 1st gear?



Also how was your engine break in procedure? Do you think you guys broke it in well?

Have a good day!
 

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Hey what's up guys! Let's say you're cruising in 6th gear and you're coming to a stop. Do you just pull the clutch lever in and shift down all the way to first or down shift one gear at a time by pulling in the clutch lever in then letting go then pulling in until you reach 1st gear?



Also how was your engine break in procedure? Do you think you guys broke it in well?

Have a good day!
Me personally like a bunch of other people hold the clutch in once and shift down untill gear 1 :)
 

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I've only been riding 6 months, but I'll give you my humble opinion based on a combination of logic, what I was taught, and my own experiences.

It depends, if I have enough room to plan my stop, then I work my way through the gears since in my opinion this is the most professional way to slow down.

Why?

The bike is tighter when the drive train is engaged and subsequently you're more in control of the bike. When you hold the clutch in and knock down from 6th to 1st you're coasting and are unable to react quickly in the correct gear for an immediate action/response.

If I don't have time to plan my stop, then it is what it is, and I perform an emergency stop by Front Brake to take the lion's share of the braking, Rear brake as backup, then pull the clutch and power down through the gears from 6th to 1st before grounding my left boot.

In my opinion you do the best thing given the circumstance you're presented with. The best thing is often not the easiest (laziest?) thing. It requires more work, but it gives you better risk protection and continually develops your skill as a rider.

Cheers
 

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I love it. I'd say half my stopping power is from engine braking and it sounds awesome. Like Joker said you have full control of the bike. You can fail a road test here in British Columbia if you hold the clutch in too far away from the stop line.
 

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This is mind blowing to me. I have never thought of just holding in the clutch and coasting while shifting down all the way to first. If I know I'm gonna be coming to a stop or slowing down for a corner, I down shift gear by gear and let engine braking help with slowing down. As the others above have said, it will keep you in way better control and allow you to quickly accelerate out of a bad situation if you ever had to. Of course in an emergency/sudden braking situation, everything changes.
 

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I downshift through the gears, helps me practice, and at stoplights i stay in first incase i have to ride out for any reason, none of that sitting in N waiting to get rear ended stuff.
 

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I've been riding on the street for 32 years. As for what I do, it varies with the situation. It is important to learn how to match your gears with the road speed. After long enough, you really won't even think about it.

Some people will say that the engine is not a brake, although I am not jumping into that mix. What I will say is, each motorcycle has different engine braking characteristics...and some motorcycles have very little (such as 2-strokes).

Practice makes perfect, so the more miles, the better! If this is your first bike, I'd encourage getting all of the hands-on training you can, since you are laying the foundation for your riding future. :)
 

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Same as a car. Your results may vary but you want to keep control at all times. Going through the gears with mild engine-braking and rev-matching is the most effective way to be in control. 6th full-clutch-to-stop is just lazy and foolish. What if you needed to suddenly accelerate? Where are you at? What gear are you in? You're down to probably 1.2k RPMs now causing a jerk-reaction and upsetting the chassis. Control the bike, don't let the bike control you.
 

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This.

Always remain mindful of an escape route and be in a gear that will accelerate if necessary. Ability to accelerate at a moment's notice is part of what keeps you safe.
Also, I forgot to add...I always try to make sure that I am in 1st when I come to a stop...because you never know when you may need to get out of trouble from an approaching vehicle. You're not going anywhere if you're sitting at the light in 4th gear, trying to hunt for a lower gear!
 

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Agree! I carefully read the manual. In the Breaking session, it suggest "shift down one feat at a time". for me, as a very beginner, it is also a great practice to get familiar won matching the engine speed and the riding speed.
 

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When I first started riding and didn't know better (it's been several years...) I would just grab the clutch and coast. But using the engine to do the braking and downshifting - I hardly even have to use my brakes. Plus, if you keep it in 6th and are slowing and you need to move fast for whatever reason, you have to shift first before you can let the clutch go otherwise you won't have power or you'll potentially lock your rear tire....so in that time you could already be in a bad place.
 
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