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Help!!!

Trying to use this method to access codes on a 2007 ER6N, but getting nothing. Cable made to link kds to obd2, using autel scanner on kwp2000 but not connecting. Surely kawasaki use the same system on different models.

Any help much appreciated
 

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Help!!!

Trying to use this method to access codes on a 2007 ER6N, but getting nothing. Cable made to link kds to obd2, using autel scanner on kwp2000 but not connecting. Surely kawasaki use the same system on different models.

Any help much appreciated
Make sure the wires are correct on the adapter you made, it’s easy to have it backwards because of looking at it from a different angle. When you connect the scanner, does it power on? I think I had to swap the k lines when I made mine. If you have an auto-select for protocol, try it. It’s unlikely they are using anything other than KWP-2000, but there are plenty of other standards they could be using. Outside of these things, I don’t have any experience with that bike, but I would imagine someone has done this before.
 

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Help!!!

Trying to use this method to access codes on a 2007 ER6N, but getting nothing. Cable made to link kds to obd2, using autel scanner on kwp2000 but not connecting. Surely kawasaki use the same system on different models.

Any help much appreciated
I've seen it quoted there may be two of these connectors on your bike. You have to select the correct one for it to work of course. I can't give credence to this as I don't own an 07 ER6N

This shows it up under the passenger seat:
 

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This took a bit of mucking around to nut this out but we ended-up with a great solution for clearing codes without having to do the "Kawasaki code clear silly dance 3 times".

Parts needed:
OBD-II socket from a car.

Soldering iron, solder, electrical tape to join 4 wires neatly to the loom.

I went to the local car wrecker and bought an OBD-II (On Board Diagnostics) socket from a random Holden Commodore for $10 but I expect with some searching you could get one for nothing from a wreck and any manufacturer in the last 20 years odd will have an OBD2 in the dash.

Make sure they leave some of the wiring loom attached (150mm or so)
Make sure it has 5 wires coming out of it at least.

Below is a picture of a OBD2 socket pinout, the pins you need for the Ninja 400 are:

Pin 4 - Ground
Pin 5 - Ground
Pin 7 - K-line
Pin 15 - L-Line
Pin 16 - +12v

If the 5 wires on your OBD-2 socket are not those pins don't panic, it's easy enough to insert a small screwdriver in the socket and un-clip a pin, slide it out the back of the plug and put it into the right hole.

Locate the KDS plug under the seat (picture attached below)
It's in a opaque plastic boot with rubber-band holding it in place.
There is a black 6 pin plug (ABS) and a white 4 pin plug (KDS), the KDS is the one you want.

From the back (wire side) of the KDS the wire colours are:

BK/W --- GY/BL
BR/W --- LG/BK

From your OBD-2 socket:

Join the wires from pin 4 and 5 together and connect it to KDS-BK/W
OBD2- pin 7 connected to KDS-GY/BL
OBD2- pin 15 connected to KDS-LG/BK
OBD2- pin 16 connected to KDS-BR/W

From another project I already had some Tyco superseal pins so used the blank KDS cap to make a socket but you could wire direct to the wires in the loom or try and source a matching socket. Don't remove the KDS plug from the loom though as your bike shop will use it during a service.

Picture below of the Commodore OBD2 socket after changing the 4 pins to suit the Ninja.

All you do then is plug-in a simple OBD2 reader ($20 odd on ebay like the MaxiScan below) and you can read the codes and clear them.

Make sure t.hat the OBD2 reader you get does the protocol KWP-2000 (Key Word Protocol). Most but not all readers do KWP, the manual for the reader should show the details in the specs sheet

We mounted it under the pillion seat for easy access on the Ninja 400.

Takes about 3 seconds to plug this in and clear the code from the dash.
Wire 5 Volt attach to pin 7 or 15 ?? ( wire color on mine are different)
 

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Anyone with a Z400 have this white 4 pin connector? I only have a black 6 pin rubber boot and a red connector with some type of cap on it. I ordered a 6pin-obd cable but my bluetooth scanner isn't reading the ECU. Not sure if the issue is the cable, the scanner, or me!
 

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2019 Ninja 400 ABS, Pearl Storm Gray
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I don't have a Z400, but on my N400, this is what is under my seat -- are you looking in the same place? (Or did I totally misunderstand your question! :) )

The white 4-pin connector is OBD2 -- you have to remove the cap you see there.

(The black 6-pin connector is for ABS and is not OBD2, I believe.)

15546
 

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What year is your Z400?

Maybe this will help -- pics of my 4-pin connector and the corresponding obd2 adapter...

PS if you want any specific pictures, just ask! I can count pins on the OBD2 as well, if the picture is ambiguous.

15550


15551


15552


15553
 

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Anyone with a Z400 have this white 4 pin connector? I only have a black 6 pin rubber boot and a red connector with some type of cap on it. I ordered a 6pin-obd cable but my bluetooth scanner isn't reading the ECU. Not sure if the issue is the cable, the scanner, or me!
The bluetooth ones can be fussy at the best of times and there are so many cheap knock off variations you just never know where the problem is. I gave up on those long ago.
 

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This took a bit of mucking around to nut this out but we ended-up with a great solution for clearing codes without having to do the "Kawasaki code clear silly dance 3 times".

Parts needed:
OBD-II socket from a car.

Soldering iron, solder, electrical tape to join 4 wires neatly to the loom.

I went to the local car wrecker and bought an OBD-II (On Board Diagnostics) socket from a random Holden Commodore for $10 but I expect with some searching you could get one for nothing from a wreck and any manufacturer in the last 20 years odd will have an OBD2 in the dash.

Make sure they leave some of the wiring loom attached (150mm or so)
Make sure it has 5 wires coming out of it at least.

Below is a picture of a OBD2 socket pinout, the pins you need for the Ninja 400 are:

Pin 4 - Ground
Pin 5 - Ground
Pin 7 - K-line
Pin 15 - L-Line
Pin 16 - +12v

If the 5 wires on your OBD-2 socket are not those pins don't panic, it's easy enough to insert a small screwdriver in the socket and un-clip a pin, slide it out the back of the plug and put it into the right hole.

Locate the KDS plug under the seat (picture attached below)
It's in a opaque plastic boot with rubber-band holding it in place.
There is a black 6 pin plug (ABS) and a white 4 pin plug (KDS), the KDS is the one you want.

From the back (wire side) of the KDS the wire colours are:

BK/W --- GY/BL
BR/W --- LG/BK

From your OBD-2 socket:

Join the wires from pin 4 and 5 together and connect it to KDS-BK/W
OBD2- pin 7 connected to KDS-GY/BL
OBD2- pin 15 connected to KDS-LG/BK
OBD2- pin 16 connected to KDS-BR/W

From another project I already had some Tyco superseal pins so used the blank KDS cap to make a socket but you could wire direct to the wires in the loom or try and source a matching socket. Don't remove the KDS plug from the loom though as your bike shop will use it during a service.

Picture below of the Commodore OBD2 socket after changing the 4 pins to suit the Ninja.

All you do then is plug-in a simple OBD2 reader ($20 odd on ebay like the MaxiScan below) and you can read the codes and clear them.

Make sure that the OBD2 reader you get does the protocol KWP-2000 (Key Word Protocol). Most but not all readers do KWP, the manual for the reader should show the details in the specs sheet

We mounted it under the pillion seat for easy access on the Ninja 400.

Takes about 3 seconds to plug this in and clear the code from the dash.
Ayjayef, great!! Your timing was perfect. I had a #13 code. I thought that I didn't plug the air temp sender into the air box very well. While I was messing with it I dropped the box cover and broke the wires that go into the plug. I also broke the plug while trying to "repair" it. I should have stayed inside today!! Anyways, while I was putting everything back together, I wired up my bluetooth ODBII to the harness....It works great, though I can't clear the code until I put a new plug and possibly a new sensor on the box. Thanks!!

PS anyone know what kind of plug is pictured below? The only part numbers that I can find are the entire wiring harness.... Thanks.
Found your thread and found the info useful. That exact reader you can buy at Walmart for $20. But Graves industries makes a direct adaptor which did both the 400 and 650 Ninja. Mine is a 2020 Ninja 650. The adaptor is $40 and can also be found on multiple motorcycle sites such as RevZilla, same price.
 

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I finally got around to making my KDS-OBD2 adapter. I bought an OBD2 extension cable on eBay for $5, cut it in half, and connected the 5 wires from the female plug to the MT090-4C connector. I left about a foot of cable on the OBD2 plug, so that the port is in the trunk under the passenger seat.




My first test was plugging in my Actron scanner. It worked as expected, showing a stored IAT sensor code (from previously turning the bike on before having it fully reassembled) but no MIL. Next I plugged in my $12 BT 4.0 LE transmitter, and connected my iPhone running Car Scanner to it. It was able to clear the code, as well as showing data in realtime.




If you have no use for the male OBD2 plug or just want to make things a little easier, you can find "female OBD2 extensions" on eBay that just have bare wires, for a buck or two cheaper. Scavenging an automotive part where you can move/delete pins (as shown in the OP) will let you leave out the 11 unused wires completely.

Due to Apple's lockdown stuff, you have to be more careful with which OBD2 scanner you buy. Full Bluetooth pairing requires special licensing stuff on Apple, so there are only a few of those devices and they're expensive ($100+). However, you are able to use the newer BT Low Energy technology to make a data connection without a full BT pairing (though I'm having trouble finding cheap BLE ones like mine on Amazon at the moment). There are Wi-Fi ones too, but they can be a little more complicated to set up, and tie up your Wi-Fi if you normally connect to a hotspot for data.

If you choose to run your cable to the trunk, be mindful of where the seat supports come down. It's possible to pinch the cable when you put the seat on, if it's not routed out of the way.
 
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Correction for what I started earlier the Graves adaptor only works on the Ninja 400 and perhaps earlier model Ninja 650's. The adaptor I found for the 2020 Ninja 650 was found on Woolwich racing's website and cost $38. Red plug adaptor.
 
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