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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
All parts have arrived! Getting ready for re-assembly this weekend :)

Any tips for degreasing the cylinder head bolt holes? Based on what I have found online, I am thinking of using a few drops of a degreaser on a small bottle brush/borehole brush to clean out any old oil, then blowing in compressed air to dry out the bolt holes.
 

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You definitely want the holes emptied and clean (or you can get fluid lock), but do you need to degrease them?

I think you're actually using 1:10 moly-oil solution on the threads in the snip below (on the 6 M9 bolts).

So you're doing a wet-torque followed by an angle-torque, not the traditional dry-torque...

Don't forget you need (6) new washers -- I forgot that and just ordered mine now -- hopefully replacing the coolant o-ring with a norton part this summer.

18574


18575
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 · (Edited)
You definitely want the holes emptied and clean (or you can get fluid lock), but do you need to degrease them?
My thinking was that using just a few drops of degreaser on a brush would remove any old moly solution, and a little compressed air would dry everything out. I picked up a degreaser that leaves no residue.

I think you're actually using 1:10 moly-oil solution on the threads in the snip below (on the 6 M9 bolts).

So you're doing a wet-torque followed by an angle-torque, not the traditional dry-torque...
Yes. Clean an dry everything, then apply fresh moly-oil solution.

Don't forget you need (6) new washers -- I forgot that and just ordered mine now -- hopefully replacing the coolant o-ring with a norton part this summer.
Crap. I did forget. Just ordered from Revzilla. Hopefully they will arrive by next weekend. Sigh.

I looked up the coolant o-ring from Norton--may as well order that while I'm in here. [Edit: The coolant O-ring sits on the top of the crankcase underneath the cylinders, and not between the cylinders and engine top end. I will not be replacing the Coolant O-ring]
 

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sbk is right, no sealer or anything should go on the head gaskets, they have a coating that under torque and heat after running that creates a seal. I want to say I heard somewhere not to handle them alot with your hands(I wear rubber shop gloves when working with them anyway)
Some, on car restorations, will use a copper coating/spray, but I can say I have never used one since usually they recommend clean and free of anything at all.

Also try, as much as you can to have both head surfaces clean and free of oil, rag debris, etc.

For valve cover, rubber gaskets, I also use Permatex, the stuff you got should work good, I have used it before.
I also use the grey stuff, anything that is made for oil.....but never the red, when I was younger I had some bad experiences with it a few times(could have also been what I was doing and how) and typically avoid it now.
Usually you only need to apply the sealant in the areas that are corners or seems/creases. Not everywhere.
Typically the service manuals instruct as to where.

When I was a BMW mechanic they used some german crap that was blue, looked like a grease, eventually got somewhat tacky and rubbery but never really dried to anything 100% solid on the rubber surfaces it was touching, I forget the name and pretty sure since 2001 it might no longer be any good(I think I still have a tube of it in one of my toolbox drawers)

We also use to use a liquid on electrical connections that was called stabilant, that created a clean, non-corroding and additionally conductive connection......was like $60 for a eye dropper size bottle. I still have some somewhere I use very sparingly :)

The gasket stuff you are talking about, is used to just hold a gasket in place where it would typically creep or slid during part installation. Its not actual sealant.
I have some from Mr. Gasket, has little brush attached to the cap like the PVC glue does.
I would not use this on the head gasket.
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
Oh boy...for some reason I didn't think about having to re-install all of the valves on the new top end. Anyone done that before? It looks like quite the task, including a few special tools and heating the engine top end in a ?pot of motor oil heated to 248-302F

I am now thinking of returning the top end and picking up that Z400 engine off ebay.

The engine on ebay is from a 2020 model with EX400GE-A4-1908, and the number stamped on my 2019 engine is EX400GE-A4-7724. Does anyone know if those last four numbers signify a meaningful difference? I can't seem to find anything.
 

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Dang, yeah I have on valves, but if its a bare head, it will be guides, springs, clips, etc. all needs to be moved over, can be quite the task.

I want to say that is like a vin and the last 4 is going to be date, or batch, or etc. I would imagine they are all maybe somewhat different on the last 4?

Actually its the last 4 of the VIN of your bike....so the bike it came off of, that is the last 4 of its VIN
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
Dang, yeah I have on valves, but if its a bare head, it will be guides, springs, clips, etc. all needs to be moved over, can be quite the task.
I feel like I am digging in deeper and deeper...I think @sbk1198 was right when he suggested purchasing a whole new engine from the beginning...

I want to say that is like a vin and the last 4 is going to be date, or batch, or etc. I would imagine they are all maybe somewhat different on the last 4?

Actually its the last 4 of the VIN of your bike....so the bike it came off of, that is the last 4 of its VIN
Just checked on my bike. The last four numbers on the engine do match the last four numbers of my VIN. Since all of the other numbers match, I would say that is a good sign. And since I still need to get a bunch of stuff to do the valves (saying nothing about doing the actual work), it would be about the same price buying the new engine off ebay (and returning the new engine top end).

But I would like a conformation that a 2020 engine will work in a 2019 bike. I tried calling Kawasaki to see if they could provide the confirmation...and they cannot! 🤯 So I guess I will be reading up on valves as much as I can, until I can confirm that the engines are swappable (I also messaged the seller on Ebay).
 

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Just thinking aloud... If you're purchasing a whole new engine, what would you do with the old one? If you're just going to part it out, it might not hurt to risk a few more parts and take your cap to a local machine shop and ask them to tig weld it -- don't even tell them what it is -- and button it all back up and see how it goes?
 

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Right, put the cap on the head that is cracked without the cams in there and torque it down in normal sequence, all even and flush, so it all lines up, have someone tack weld the cracked seam in a few spots with a TIG and then pull it all off and weld it up nice on the bench
 

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Another option would be to take both your heads to a head shop (no, not that !!) and have them move the parts over. It's been awhile but I used to do that with my 71 mustang. I know of three of these shops still around in Los Angeles. You could probably watch them and learn a ton.
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
Just thinking aloud... If you're purchasing a whole new engine, what would you do with the old one? If you're just going to part it out, it might not hurt to risk a few more parts and take your cap to a local machine shop and ask them to tig weld it -- don't even tell them what it is -- and button it all back up and see how it goes?
Right, put the cap on the head that is cracked without the cams in there and torque it down in normal sequence, all even and flush, so it all lines up, have someone tack weld the cracked seam in a few spots with a TIG and then pull it all off and weld it up nice on the bench
Yeah, given the other options, I am now thinking that a repair is worth a try.

Along some of the back roads were I do my riding, there is a local welder that advertises with sculptures out front. Just gave him a call and he said he will take a look at it tomorrow morning.

Another option would be to take both your heads to a head shop (no, not that !!) and have them move the parts over. It's been awhile but I used to do that with my 71 mustang. I know of three of these shops still around in Los Angeles. You could probably watch them and learn a ton.
I would love to learn from someone experienced. Unfortunately, all the local motorcycle shops have a huge backlog of work, and I don't think they would be too keen on having a customer look over their shoulder. I have passed one or two small engine repair shops on the back roads (rural towns--working out of their home), so depending how the repair goes, I might call around and see if they have any experience with motorcycles.

Its funny...the one thought that has been popping into my head throughout this whole ordeal, is that I really need to get a second bike. It would take off a lot of pressure to get this thing fixed, and I could still be out riding.
 

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EDIT: Whoops, my bad, disregard this post. The cylinder head does not contain the oring cavity. Sheesh, methinks this covid vaccine is messing with me brain.


So i'm doing some research on this naughty OEM coolant seal. @TwoLeftThumbs , if you still have your new cylinder head and the part number is the new 11008-0967, did you notice any difference with the old one, a 2018-19? Can you post a pic of the coolant reservoir cavity area where the oring sits? I would like to know if Kawa altered anything there. It would be much appreciated.
 

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Just thinking aloud... If you're purchasing a whole new engine, what would you do with the old one? If you're just going to part it out, it might not hurt to risk a few more parts and take your cap to a local machine shop and ask them to tig weld it -- don't even tell them what it is -- and button it all back up and see how it goes?
He's gonna sell it to me that's what. Now stop giving him any other ideas! :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
He's gonna sell it to me that's what. Now stop giving him any other ideas! :p
Sorry @sbk1198, but after getting overwhelmed with the thought of having to do the valves, I went ahead and got the broken cam shaft cap welded! $80 for same day service on Saturday from a local welder. The repair ain't pretty, but he completely took out the twist, so I am optimistic that this will work! Hopefully the cylinder head bolt washers will come in this week!

18669



Revzilla just approved return of the new engine top end...They shipped the Engine top end to me in large box without any filler. So the brand new top end had a few days to bounce around during transit. The intake manifolds punched through the side of the box and got dented. Probably still useable, but definitely not brand new condition.


EDIT: Whoops, my bad, disregard this post. The cylinder head does not contain the oring cavity. Sheesh, methinks this covid vaccine is messing with me brain.


So i'm doing some research on this naughty OEM coolant seal. @TwoLeftThumbs , if you still have your new cylinder head and the part number is the new 11008-0967, did you notice any difference with the old one, a 2018-19? Can you post a pic of the coolant reservoir cavity area where the oring sits? I would like to know if Kawa altered anything there. It would be much appreciated.
You are correct. Cylinder head does not contain the Coolant seal O-ring cavity. I realized this after I made my post. It sits on the top of the crank case underneath the cylinders. I will not be taking out the cylinders to make this replacement.
 

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Sorry @sbk1198, but after getting overwhelmed with the thought of having to do the valves, I went ahead and got the broken cam shaft cap welded! $80 for same day service on Saturday from a local welder. The repair ain't pretty, but he completely took out the twist, so I am optimistic that this will work! Hopefully the cylinder head bolt washers will come in this week!

View attachment 18669


Revzilla just approved return of the new engine top end...They shipped the Engine top end to me in large box without any filler. So the brand new top end had a few days to bounce around during transit. The intake manifolds punched through the side of the box and got dented. Probably still useable, but definitely not brand new condition.
Well shoot! I tried lol How much was the new one you bought and returned? Also whoever packaged that was clearly an idiot! lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #77 ·
Well shoot! I tried lol How much was the new one you bought and returned? Also whoever packaged that was clearly an idiot! lol
The brand new engine top was $1200 with tax and shipping...so about the same price as the only Z400 engine listed on Ebay, and about twice as much as a salvage bike.

Yeah, not sure who packed it...even on the return slip it says that any returned item shipped without filler is grounds for rejection!

@TwoLeftThumbs I am excited to hear how this goes!!!

You might just run a plastigauge measurement before you button up finally... I did so many years ago -- at least you can see if left and right sides look similar...
Just ordered the Plastigauge. Hopefully everything will be in spec! 🤞

I started binge watching every motorcycle engine rebuild video I could find on YouTube since Saturday. The insides of engines are starting to look quite familiar! Hopefully just a little bit of knowledge will rub off.
 

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PS though now I find myself wondering... With the springs pushing the camshaft up, won't you get a skewed measurement?
 

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The brand new engine top was $1200 with tax and shipping...so about the same price as the only Z400 engine listed on Ebay, and about twice as much as a salvage bike.

I started binge watching every motorcycle engine rebuild video I could find on YouTube since Saturday. The insides of engines are starting to look quite familiar! Hopefully just a little bit of knowledge will rub off.
Hmm...yeah $1200 is a lot more than I'd be willing to spend on one. I would rather buy a whole used engine instead, which is what I'll do when mine blows up lol

I watched a lot of videos before I dug into the engine as well, but honestly the most helpful thing was having the service manual while I was working and just taking it step by step.
 
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