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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just saw this on my rear. This can’t be normal? Can this still function alright with a crack?
 

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No its not normal you need to get changed ,it looks like its the brake caliper ,
its your brakes so don't mess about get a new one
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
My brake fluid looks like this after only 4500 miles. Could bad brake fluid help cause the cracks. And Isn’t 4500 miles for it to go bad too soon? I’m going to figure out how to change this. Everything on the bike is a first for me, I’m learning how to do maintenance as I go.
 

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I just saw this on my rear. This can’t be normal? Can this still function alright with a crack?
It looks like a normal valley designed into the pad to allow gasses and pad dust to move off the pad and rotor surface during use. I haven't seen Ninja 400 Rear pads, but this is a common feature for pads to have.

Your Rotor and pads look fine, but your brake fluid is darker than I would like. Check a couple YouTube videos, it's not hard to flush.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It looks like a normal valley designed into the pad to allow gasses and pad dust to move off the pad and rotor surface during use. I haven't seen Ninja 400 Rear pads, but this is a common feature for pads to have.

Your Rotor and pads look fine, but your brake fluid is darker than I would like. Check a couple YouTube videos, it's not hard to flush.
Well that's interesting. Can anyone confirm their Ninja 400 has these as well??
 

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Yes, that's the normal pad design.

And get that brake fluid flushed. It should be honey colored, not coffee. How's the front brake fluid, is it the same colour? Should bleed that also.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Yes, that's the normal pad design.

And get that brake fluid flushed. It should be honey colored, not coffee. How's the front brake fluid, is it the same colour? Should bleed that also.
Ahh, live and learn i guess. The front fluid looks fine. For some reason the rear is very dark. I'll figure out how to change it.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Is a flush at this point absolutely necessary or can I just change the fluid? And do a flush later down the road? I’ll buy the tool I need for that and figure all that ou if I need to, just checking.
 
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I just saw this on my rear. This can’t be normal? Can this still function alright with a crack?
Totally Normal Brake Pad...



That brake fluid is contaminated - Yes, Change it. Brake fluid will readily absorb moisture from the air, the cap may not have been fully secured. Brake lines will also have rubber dust if not cleaned out during the manufacturing process. make a log with the date it was noticed, call your dealer make them change it...
 

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Is a flush at this point absolutely necessary or can I just change the fluid? And do a flush later down the road? I’ll buy the tool I need for that and figure all that ou if I need to, just checking.
Jerry rig a kit similar to this:

https://www.sportbiketrackgear.com/speed-bleeder-bag-and-hose-kit/

brake fluid and appropriate size wrench to adjust the bleeder screw.

Just do it when you get all the apparatus. Changing and flushing is one the same.

Food for thought: brake fluid is hygrophobic, meaning it absorbs moisture easily. Is extremely corrosive to paint. If you spill it, wipe it immediately with a wet rag. You know it should be replaced every 3 months. But the average rider won't do that, usually every 2 years for the average joe. Racers flush it every session.
 
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Discussion Starter #11
Jerry rig a kit similar to this:

https://www.sportbiketrackgear.com/speed-bleeder-bag-and-hose-kit/

brake fluid and appropriate size wrench to adjust the bleeder screw.

Just do it when you get all the apparatus. Changing and flushing is one the same.

Food for thought: brake fluid is hygrophobic, meaning it absorbs moisture easily. Is extremely corrosive to paint. If you spill it, wipe it immediately with a wet rag. You know it should be replaced every 3 months. But the average rider won't do that, usually every 2 years for the average joe. Racers flush it every session.
Thanks everyone. Any good recommendations for brake fluid? I do know it needs to be dot4.
 
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