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Got everything installed last night. What an improvement! Instructions were super helpful. Only thing I would improve would be regarding the installation of the shift detent spring. Following the recommended instructions did not work for me at all. What I had to do was remove the oem shift star, install the detent spring on the shift arm and torque it down, then use channel locks to hold the shift arm up against the detent spring wall while I reseated and reinstalled the shift star.

Also, might be good to add that in order to remove the clutch cover, the clutch lever cable needs to be detensioned first.
 
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Discussion Starter #62
Got everything installed last night. What an improvement! Instructions were super helpful. Only thing I would improve would be regarding the installation of the shift detent spring. Following the recommended instructions did not work for me at all. What I had to do was remove the oem shift star, install the detent spring on the shift arm and torque it down, then use channel locks to hold the shift arm up against the detent spring wall while I reseated and reinstalled the shift star.

Also, might be good to add that in order to remove the clutch cover, the clutch lever cable needs to be detensioned first.
Great, thank you, I'll add some notes to the article
 

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If you have both and can measure differences in the rods and differences in the stock bearing and spears supplied bearing that might be helpful. Regarding differenes, probably doesn't matter, but a larger bearing will be stronger, so if his bearing has smaller balls to be thinner technically it isn't as strong, just like us machining the flange technically makes the flange weaker, but as long as neither fail, it doesn't matter as long as clearance is increased.
I was concerned about that so i have machined mine back to 2.0mm flange thickness from 2.57 stock. So a compromise between what you suggested for clearance and stock clearance. I'm going to put it back in this arvo and will slip some washers under the head of the three spring bolts to put a bit more tension on the them.

Can confirm 2018 model bearing width is 8mm
 

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Trying to adjust my clutch lever freeplay and trying to get a baseline from previous. After doing barnett clutch springs, and upgraded pull rod, do I want to increase or decrease clutch lever freeplay?
 

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Trying to adjust my clutch lever freeplay and trying to get a baseline from previous. After doing barnett clutch springs, and upgraded pull rod, do I want to increase or decrease clutch lever freeplay?
Just make sure there a little slop at the end of the clutch lever and and that it's fully disengaged when fully pulled in. This is universal and irrespective of what's been done to the clutch.
 

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Just make sure there a little slop at the end of the clutch lever and and that it's fully disengaged when fully pulled in. This is universal and irrespective of what's been done to the clutch.
Had to loosen the freeplay. Looks like I had the lever an entire thread too tight from before. Guess that's what happens when you finish the job at 4am and have work in the morning. Lol. Thanks.
 

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When I torqued up the clutch spring bolts last wkd to the specified torque setting of 10Nm (89 inch/lb) it felt a bit on the light side. Anyone else think the same? I havent done a ton of clutch work as all my previous bikes have had good clutches so not sure if this figure is about what most clutches require. Just dont want them coming loose.
As a comparison the torque setting for the 6mm clutch case cover bolts is pretty much the same at 9.8Nm.
 

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Got everything installed last night. What an improvement! Instructions were super helpful. Only thing I would improve would be regarding the installation of the shift detent spring. Following the recommended instructions did not work for me at all. What I had to do was remove the oem shift star, install the detent spring on the shift arm and torque it down, then use channel locks to hold the shift arm up against the detent spring wall while I reseated and reinstalled the shift star.

Also, might be good to add that in order to remove the clutch cover, the clutch lever cable needs to be detensioned first.
That’s good to know - I got the detent spring installed with the arm & star in place the first time I had my clutch on the operating table by using a screwdriver to push/guide the end of the detent spring under the boss, but I’m going to be replacing the star (and shift shaft and clutch) soon and I was wondering if I’ll be able to get away with leaving the shift arm in place, since I’ve already got the heavy duty detent spring installed on it. Sounds like I will.
 

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Just wanted to chime in that I upgraded my clutch over the weekend. I installed the Barnett springs and friction plates along with the Spears clutch pull rod / bearing kit and clutch cable assist spring. I bought a new gasket to install but the existing one was in pristine condition so I reused it. So far no leaks. If it does, I'll put the bike on it's side and replace it. Clutch feel is still very light but I might be biased as my other bike has a fairly stiff clutch lever in comparison [N1k]. So overall, install was easy. Hardest part was just getting the fairing pieces removed and back on. I wasn't about to tuck wrenches behind fairings so I removed the lower half (which is really the middle section if you count the section removed for oil changes as lowest). So, anyone with reasonable DIY mechanic skills should be able to tackle this in an afternoon (assuming you have all the misc parts like threadlocker and moly grease and soak the friction disks the night before). By the way, my stock friction plates looked decent to me. I was just starting to get some slip at the top end when I pulled the trigger on the upgrade. I probably could have reused them but I wanted to be able to say I fully upgraded the clutch if I sell the bike. One suggestion is to take pics of each bolt as you remove them (clutch cover and fairings). Really helps on reinstallation. And take a pic of your clutch cable adjustments both at the clutch housing and the lever. Helps you get back to where you were much faster.
 

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Just wanted to chime in that I upgraded my clutch over the weekend. I installed the Barnett springs and friction plates along with the Spears clutch pull rod / bearing kit and clutch cable assist spring. I bought a new gasket to install but the existing one was in pristine condition so I reused it. So far no leaks. If it does, I'll put the bike on it's side and replace it. Clutch feel is still very light but I might be biased as my other bike has a fairly stiff clutch lever in comparison [N1k]. So overall, install was easy. Hardest part was just getting the fairing pieces removed and back on. I wasn't about to tuck wrenches behind fairings so I removed the lower half (which is really the middle section if you count the section removed for oil changes as lowest). So, anyone with reasonable DIY mechanic skills should be able to tackle this in an afternoon (assuming you have all the misc parts like threadlocker and moly grease and soak the friction disks the night before). By the way, my stock friction plates looked decent to me. I was just starting to get some slip at the top end when I pulled the trigger on the upgrade. I probably could have reused them but I wanted to be able to say I fully upgraded the clutch if I sell the bike. One suggestion is to take pics of each bolt as you remove them (clutch cover and fairings). Really helps on reinstallation. And take a pic of your clutch cable adjustments both at the clutch housing and the lever. Helps you get back to where you were much faster.
Could you let us know how you find the Barnett plates for launching from stationary once you've got some hours on them?
 

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Installed Barnett clutch springs and a Norton clutch cable spring on my new '20 Z400. The installation was easy and it certainly feels better at the clutch lever with more resistance and it's holding well so far. I lost no oil with the bike leaned onto the side stand and, since the '20 clutches have factory-revised pull rods, I didn't have to change it. Cheers!

12784


12785
 

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I'm now in day 2 of installing Norton's Clutch Upgrade Kit. I want to add some things that I found. It's taking more than a day to install because I'm doing it solo and first time diving into the clutch and I is amateur haha. Definitely need to prep beforehand, here's some of the tools needed. I bought a new gasket, shift star bolt, oil filter, full synthetic oil, etc.

IMG_20200517_083452.jpg



I decided to undo the clutch cable completely because so much easier to remove from the pull arm. The case gasket looked OK, but i will be using a new one. Lots of RTV sealant overflow. Removed what I can. Added tin foil to cover the hole into the abyss.

IMG_20200516_140948.jpg



I dabbed a paint line here to give me an indication for re-tightening torque.
IMG_20200516_132933.jpg




I used the motion pro clutch holder tool, but it slipped and gouged the teeth of the basket. Had to grind the tool a smidge to fit the recesses of the clutch teeth deeper. Best if another person held the clutch holder tool and another to operate the rattle gun.
IMG_20200517_075900.jpg


This is important: Be sure to file down any gouges, burrs on the clutch basket or else the steel clutch plates will be hindered from gliding smoothly along the clutch teeth.
IMG_20200517_075620.jpg



Add a good amount of grease within the seal here.
IMG_20200516_190344.jpg



I heated the shift star bolt using a propane torch for a good minute give or take, smoke everywhere, that was fun! Let it cool a bit, then using a flat-tip screw driver, pry it between one of the shift star arms and the tab to loosen or torque the bolt.
IMG_20200516_171318.jpg



I noticed on the backside of the clutch spring retaining plate there are tiny fissures. Yikes! Hard to tell if it's crap casting or stress marks. Someone please produce a billet version.
IMG_20200516_123247.jpg



A note about the Blueprinted Shift Shaft: the paw component is re-machined, much less slop in the slide action and has more engagement with the shift star pegs. The axial play of the entire shaft is considerably reduced than stock. I opted to add an additional washer about 1 mm thick to reduce slop even more. Presently there is about 1~2 mm of slop at the shift shaft.

I'll report more if I find anything else worth noting....
 

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Norton Clutch Upgrade Kit Preliminary Review

All parts included in the kit is installed in my N400 sans transmission undercutting. Decided to keep the judder spring in because I did not want any potential harshness or vibrations when shifting. First time trying with Motul 7100 full synthetic at @4800 km. Initial run duration of about 100 km.

First let me start with the oil, compared to the previous Kawa dino oil. I found there is an overall smoothness every where as in shifting, revving and cruising. Engine seems somewhat quieter at idle. I observed this by placing my ear close to the engine and carefully listening to the valve-train sounds as the bike was warming up from cold start.

Now with the clutch mechanics, well, Holy ****! It is pure butter! I almost shed a tear of joy, and was grinning like a lunatic the first time! I couldn't feel any slop in any of the shifting components. Paired with aftermarket rear-sets, any slop was reduced even more. Shifting up, down, finding neutral is so effortless, yet distinct in engagement. Rev-matching is easier now. I did install a Spears Racing straight clutch cable and it contributed to the smoothness in the lever feel, no binding or roughness was experienced throughout the lever pull travel.

Pick-up and launches are firm and smooth with the Barnett frictions and springs. Compared to stock frictions, the Barnett's are a tad better in grabbing, not too drastic though. Perhaps if I swapped the judder spring and skinny friction plate for a wide one, the grab would be more firm. But, I won't because it is just fine with standard setup for the street.

Hats off to Jesse and the folks at Norton Motorsports and Ninja400R for giving the masses such amazing products!

And Spears Racing also, their parts are great!

PS,
A note about adjusting clutch cable after clutch mod install: I do this to all my bikes (well, the 2 that I've ever owned) when adjusting clutch cable free-play. Warning: do this procedure outdoors because deadly CO emissions. Prop the bike on a paddock stand. Then start the engine (let it warm if from cold start if you like), stand beside the bike, put up the kickstand, pull the clutch lever in all the way and throw it into first gear with your right hand. Observe the rear wheel while holding the clutch lever right against the handlebar. If you got the proper cable play, the rear wheel will spin initially as you change gears from neutral to first, then it will come to a halt. If it continues to spin infinitely, you got too much cable slack. You could even put your right hand on the rear tire while keeping the clutch lever pulled in and have a feel of the clutch engagement if any. Adjust the cable tensioners by tightening to reduce slack. Ideally, you don't want the rear wheel to be spinning or the clutch plates are still engaged while the lever is pulled all the way. Too much slack is dangerous because it can prevent clutch disengagement. You could even observe and measure the actual clutch engagement at the lever.

Happy trails!

PPS,
Don't forget to put down the kickstand after adjustments and before removing the paddock stand, lolz, that's how i got my first drop.


.
 

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Great review, thanks! I love the 7100.

Me too! It's blood red, smells of ripe cherry, with a hint of applewood. Was so tempted for a swig.
 

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Good info and write-up. Thanks! I do have one observation about wet clutches—Even when the clutch is very properly adjusted, there can still be a “viscous-drive” effect from disc-clinging oil which will tend to weakly spin the rear wheel (similar to the operation of a torque converter) without the discs actually dragging and wearing. As long as the wheel is EASY to stop by hand, I have found no adverse clutch effects from this. Cheers.
 

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Yeah, the "viscous-drive" effect can be felt when I turned the wheel the opposite direction. There is significantly more resistance. Also there is more resistance applied by the friction of the rubber chain-guide.
 
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