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Whats up guys,

Last June i bought my 2019 Black Ninja 400, honestly love this bike and it was perfect for someone like me who was new to motorcycles in general. Since last year ive gained roughly 20lbs and am weighing 240lbs standing at 6'2. i feel comfortable on the bike (or else i wouldn't have gotten it) but the last couple times ive riden this month wether it be in 20 or 10mph winds i cant even go 70-80 mph without the bike moving all over the **** place. Is this maybe just cause i still have to get use to riding in windy conditions or am i possibly too heavy/big for this bike? Looking for some thoughts and if anyone else has ever had a similar issue.
 

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A common beginners' mistake is to tighten up your arms when you're at highway speed, which creates a cycle of feedback between you and the bike and the wind. Wind hits you like a sail, sends the bike drifting off course, you tighten up your arms and grip which exacerbates the problem.

I'm only about 185lbs but I had a similar sensation until I got better at really loosening my grip on the bars and letting my whole upper body relax. Don't know if that's your problem, but it's something to pay attention to when you're on the highway.
 

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Whats up guys,

Last June i bought my 2019 Black Ninja 400, honestly love this bike and it was perfect for someone like me who was new to motorcycles in general. Since last year ive gained roughly 20lbs and am weighing 240lbs standing at 6'2. i feel comfortable on the bike (or else i wouldn't have gotten it) but the last couple times ive riden this month wether it be in 20 or 10mph winds i cant even go 70-80 mph without the bike moving all over the **** place. Is this maybe just cause i still have to get use to riding in windy conditions or am i possibly too heavy/big for this bike? Looking for some thoughts and if anyone else has ever had a similar issue.
Gusting wind will move you, no matter how large or small you are. The best thing you can do is take advantage of your windscreen and try to tuck under it. Wind coming from the front is annoying but as @chronax posted, you need to loosen up. I'd say you should be gripping the tank of your bike with your thighs. This will help stabilize you on it. Also, when you get a gust of wind from the side, it will feel awful...and you will feel it move the bike. Again, grip the tank tight with your thighs and it tuck into the bike. It will stop you from moving around in your lane.
 

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I went on an hour ride the other day in 20mph or so winds and it was the nicest windy ride I have taken. My trick was to rest my left arm on the tank and tuck over it, the wind only moved my helmet, the bike stayed on course and it was pretty nice. So in short,relax your grip and find a comfy spot to rest on the bike and it should help you out. Now your muscles after a windy hour tucked might be a different story lol.
 

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I agree I’m on a Z400 so literally no wind protection. I find if I lean into it kinda like super man my helmet diffuses most of the wind. Definitely grip the tank with your thighs that helps a lot too. Otherwise just trust your bike. You’ll get more comfortable as you ride it more.
 

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I live in Wisconsin now but I used to live in North Dakota, so I know about wind.

The advice above is good. Keep relaxed so you are not fighting the physics that keeps your bike upright. Grip with your legs and keep your arms loose. You might be blown sideways, but you won't be blown over if you let the bike do it's job. I find it best just to lean into the wind and be especially aware of my surroundings.

The wind is something to practice in and get used to just like other aspects of riding. Once I became proficient at highway riding, I purposefully sought out windy days to improve my skills. Personally, I start paying the wind close attention at about 20 mph; it's real work to ride by about 30 mph; and I have to slow down from highway speeds (and possibly choose a different route) as the wind approaches 40 mph. But that's after years of practice and getting caught in it while traveling. (I once had to outrun a truly nasty storm as there was no available shelter, like a highway bridge, for at least 20 miles.)

Tucking is good, but with your height you may benefit from a touring windshield. I have a Zero Gravity touring screen and it directs most of the air over my head when 5'7" me is sitting upright, and I can tuck all the way in.

Your surroundings govern riding on highways on windy days. You may find yourself leaned into the wind in order to travel in a straight line. Hills, bridges, and other traffic--particularly semis--can block the wind and then you suddenly veer in the direction you're leaning. I also find it a head-trip to be leaning into the wind and steering the bike the other direction. It's just weird to be leaned left while the bike is moving right to follow a highway curve. And unstable gusting conditions can be a pain under any situation. Slow down if you feel that gusty wind may blow you out of your lane, and consider rerouting to slower roads until the conditions improve. Some steeply hilled areas as well as city "canyons" can redirect the wind so it can become very unpredictable--slowing down will always increase your control and improve your margin for error.

You'll gain proficiency just by riding more and being able to anticipate what may happen. I still strongly remember bringing my first bike home. The winds were less than 10 mph, but I had to travel on 55 mph posted two-lanes to reach my home in the countryside and I felt like I was being blown all over the place. It was the first time I'd had a bike above 35 mph. I suspect that's a common feeling when one's a noobie. The more you ride, the more you'll relax and by the end of summer you won't even notice the wind.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
A common beginners' mistake is to tighten up your arms when you're at highway speed, which creates a cycle of feedback between you and the bike and the wind. Wind hits you like a sail, sends the bike drifting off course, you tighten up your arms and grip which exacerbates the problem.

I'm only about 185lbs but I had a similar sensation until I got better at really loosening my grip on the bars and letting my whole upper body relax. Don't know if that's your problem, but it's something to pay attention to when you're on the highway.
Definitely will look out for that next ride, Thanks
 

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...Now your muscles after a windy hour tucked might be a different story lol.
I can attest to this! LOL! In order to celebrate my 2year anniversary with my bike (April 6th), I decided to take a 88mile ride on Houston's Beltway 8 (it's a HUGE Loop) and take it all the way around the city. I was riding for 1hour and 30min in SW winds. Because it is a loop, 3/4 of the way I was battling winds as they kept changing directions lol. When I was done, I must say I was EXHAUSTED and hot (it hit close to the 90's today) and my wrist was fatigued...and my toes and fingers were tingling lol. So yes...riding in winds for over an hour is a bit uncomfy!
 

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Get a bigger windscreen, the stock one is horrible. Someone your height at 6’2 would need a sport touring windscreen to get into a proper tuck. I have a good sized screen on my 400 and I do mostly track riding (when the track is open ?). I always try to get a double bubble windscreen on my bikes.
F29D5462-1C02-43E9-AEB6-D7D29815F37E.jpeg
 

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Get a bigger windscreen, the stock one is horrible. Someone your height at 6’2 would need a sport touring windscreen to get into a proper tuck. I have a good sized screen on my 400 and I do mostly track riding (when the track is open ?). I always try to get a double bubble windscreen on my bikes. View attachment 12330
I have the double bubble at 6'5" and I can get a good tuck behind it. But, I will say that I have considered the larger windscreen for comfort. Is your picture with the touring wind screen? If so it looks good, that might be the push I need to get one! Lol
 

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I have the double bubble at 6'5" and I can get a good tuck behind it. But, I will say that I have considered the larger windscreen for comfort. Is your picture with the touring wind screen? If so it looks good, that might be the push I need to get one! Lol
Yes it is the touring screen, I am only 5’9 on a good day and I love it. I got it from China and it is holding up pretty good!
5CCAB0FF-C128-4CA9-83FD-CCAAA73DC962.jpeg
 

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A few pounds aren't going to make a big difference. Strong winds will make even 6000 lb trucks move around a bit, so what you're experiencing is normal. I'm almost the same weight as you but a bit shorter. I don't ride on the street anymore but I've raced in some very windy conditions. You feel the wind pushing you around a bit but it's not the end of the world.
 

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I am 5'-6" and 205 and when I first started riding again in November, especially on the highway at 70+ the wind blowing me all over was truly disturbing. Research online, reading books like Proficient Motorcycling as an example, I tried and did relax, loosened my grip, unlocked my elbows and let the wind push the bike with me on it and learned to enjoy the ride.

I intentionally rode in a thunderstorm a week ago, the hardest rain with the highest standing water to date, to practice but with strong winds and again, it was disturbing. I could have sworn the **** strong crosswinds were going to put me into a slide.

Re-gaining my senses, I relaxed following the same procedures as above and felt fine in a short period of time.

I am not sure if this helps but riding relaxed was beneficial to me.
 

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A few pounds aren't going to make a big difference. Strong winds will make even 6000 lb trucks move around a bit, so what you're experiencing is normal. I'm almost the same weight as you but a bit shorter. I don't ride on the street anymore but I've raced in some very windy conditions. You feel the wind pushing you around a bit but it's not the end of the world.
You ain't never lie homey....
 

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I just came back from a long ride on Interstates in heavy wind. I am a newbie and similar size/weight. My arms were loose, but while getting beat pretty good, I learned 2 things. I went into a greater tuck and that helped, both in headwinds and crosswinds.. Also realized my gloved fingers were getting colder than normal ( temp mid 50's F ). What it was that while my arms were loose, I was in a death grip on the handles and reducing circulation. I loosened up and... A) my fingers warmed up. and B) the bike became more stable. That and watch out for the turbulence around semis and box trucks. Interestingly the box trucks cause dirtier air than the big rigs.
 
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