Ninja 400 Riders Forum banner
1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
2017 Suzuki GSXR1000 2010 Suzuki GSXR600 x2 2018/19 N400
Joined
·
858 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know someone had asked awhile back alternate ways of tying down the bike.I had mentioned this (even tho it went upon deaf ears) thought I would show it as was in the back of the truck

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Hood Automotive lighting Tire Sky Wheel Fuel tank Motor vehicle Tire Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Hood Tire Wheel Crankset Bicycle tire Plant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
521 Posts
Personally, I think all the tiedowns are terminated TOO LOW on the motorcycle in these photos. In addition, the failure to secure to the ends of the handle bars is also an error.

The problem with both being too low and not attaching to the handlebars is that you are giving the bike great leverage against the tiedowns. This means more tension load on each tiedown, especially as the vehicle goes over irregularities in the pavement, and whenever it goes around corners - especially at highway speeds.

In addition, the resolution of the photos is not good enough to show whether or not you have used any "rails" to secure anything against the tires, on each side, right where they touch the bed of the vehicle. If you have not, that coupled with the low angle of the tiedown due to the too-low termination points on the bike, make it very easy for the bike to tip sideways on even low intensity bumps or turns.

I am a retired mechanical engineer and engineering physicist, and I am telling you that this is NOT a good tiedown scheme. The "standard" tiedown schemes used by everyone else have had decades of development and refinement. Sometimes the "old way" is indeed the best way.

Jim G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
That's how I tie down my bike on my Kendon copy trailer. Never had any issues. I strap the front wheel on to the chock as well.
 

·
Registered
2017 Suzuki GSXR1000 2010 Suzuki GSXR600 x2 2018/19 N400
Joined
·
858 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
@Jim G there are some of us without a degree that get things done in a way that's "better" for the purpose. this system is pretty simple, it doesn't put any stress on the clip-on or suspension. the bike is being pulled forward from the tie down brackets EQUAILY so it won't move side to side or backwards. how bout we make a wager of 10k that I can make it from sunny FL back to my neck of the woods without any issues with the bike being tied up the way it is !! BTW i think there are some of us that have more miles with our bikes in the back of trucks,vans,open and close trailers than some that have on the road ! this is just an "alternative" way to transport the bike from someone experienced in transportation ! let me know if you would like to take me up on my challenger fellow canuk !!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
When I used to die down the front I would use the lower triple but I hated how much it compressed the suspension. Now I just use the rear foot peg brackets as tie down points and the front tire. I've seen a few throttles get stuck from being strapped down at the handlebars.
 

·
Registered
2013 Ninja 300
Joined
·
181 Posts
It looks kind of low to me too, but if it works, it works.

I don't like to tie down on the clip on's either. I don't want any pressure on the throttle body, no matter what tie down system.
Lower triple works for me. I make sure I compress the forks only half way through. I've heard, and it makes sense to me, that if the forks can bottom out while riding, then bottoming out while tied down shouldn't break anything. Anyways, I don't do it. Half way compressed works for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,005 Posts
Just as important as "how to tie the bike down" is what you use to do it. Please get some good tiedowns like Blackwidow's or any of the Ancra's or such. All bike shops sell good ones. Don't trust your loved ones to those cheap paper thin green things they sell at Walmart or Tractor Supply. I learned the hard way. Actually, it's more important.
 

·
Registered
2017 Suzuki GSXR1000 2010 Suzuki GSXR600 x2 2018/19 N400
Joined
·
858 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
looks to low? I mean if i have to explain the laws of physics especial to a "mechanical engineer " then I guess i just need to stop feeding any useful information here :rolleyes:

@Duckman I'll only use ratcheting type like husky or rhino when I have to otherwise Pitbull TRS is the only way
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,005 Posts
looks to low? I mean if i have to explain the laws of physics especial to a "mechanical engineer " then I guess i just need to stop feeding any useful information here :rolleyes:

@Duckman I'll only use ratcheting type like husky or rhino when I have to otherwise Pitbull TRS is the only way
Man, don't get me started on ratcheting straps. We do not get along at all. It never fails I'll get the strap twisted and all caught up and people will be coming from the other side of the pits to see what all the yelling is about. I hate those muther fucking sombitches! :)

Holy Crap! That didn't get sensored!!!!!
 

·
Registered
2017 Suzuki GSXR1000 2010 Suzuki GSXR600 x2 2018/19 N400
Joined
·
858 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
@Duckman roooookie !!! LOL that's funny it didn't !! coming from a dirtbiking background, I've had the best of the best fail so when I transitioned to street, I started with conventional straps and tied them once secure,BUT once I got my hands on like the ones in the photo, never turned back !! I get frustrated with releasing the slack at times, but otherwise they work like a charm !!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,005 Posts
@Duckman roooookie !!! LOL that's funny it didn't !! coming from a dirtbiking background, I've had the best of the best fail so when I transitioned to street, I started with conventional straps and tied them once secure,BUT once I got my hands on like the ones in the photo, never turned back !! I get frustrated with releasing the slack at times, but otherwise they work like a charm !!
I know they work but they just hate me. They try to screw me every chance they get. I hate 'um! :)

I've even whooped out my knife and cut the bastards because I could not get them loose! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,005 Posts
Dude! What just happened? Ok, now we gotta test this....

crap
****
****
doo doo
piss
*******
C*&T
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
521 Posts
looks to low? I mean if i have to explain the laws of physics especial to a "mechanical engineer " then I guess i just need to stop feeding any useful information here :rolleyes:
It's pretty obvious that trying to keep an object that is over 3 feet high by attaching tiedowns to it, in an environment that simulates a constant earthquake, and experiences big side loads on turns, works best when the tiedowns are fastened to the object on points as high as practical. That's all I said and I stand fully by it, because it's basic logic. And I'm not going to continue arguing with you about something so basic.

Jim G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,005 Posts
Now Jim. You know as well as I do it’s not the height of the restraining point that’s important. It’s where the center of gravity is and getting the restraint as close as possible to a 90 degree angle to the cog for best efficiency. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
521 Posts
Now Jim. You know as well as I do it’s not the height of the restraining point that’s important. It’s where the center of gravity is and getting the restraint as close as possible to a 90 degree angle to the cog for best efficiency. :)
No. Regardless of where the center of gravity is, it is always superior to terminate the tiedowns as high as possible on the bike. High terminations increase the leverage the tiedown has on the bike's center of gravity, and thus lessens the static and dynamic loads that the tiedowns have to absorb, This can be the difference that keeps the tiedowns from breaking in event of an accident or a sharp evasive turn necessitated by either traffic or a sudden animal in the road. Why voluntarily give up this advantage?

Jim G
 

·
Registered
2017 Suzuki GSXR1000 2010 Suzuki GSXR600 x2 2018/19 N400
Joined
·
858 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
@Jim G we are NOT transporting a tractor or waterlines, who drives like a jackarse with a bike in the back anyways? you on the way to a racetrack you'll never go to? again, you probably never transport your bike much and don't understand the damage canyon dancers may cause and having the front end compress for long distances. most have or will convert to the TRS at some point. and please don't argue, just put up the 10g's so i can prove my point and disprove your rubbish theory when it comes to transporting a lightweight bike like the 400. I use the same method om my larger bikes as well WITHOUT any issues. I thought Canadians were smart,you must be from Montreal !!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
521 Posts
I am truly sorry I ever rpelied to the OP's posting, even though he specifically asked for it after an earlier post was apparently ignored. I told him what I thought, and he and you disagree. Fine. Do it your way. And yes, I have trailered bikes often over my 53 years of motorcycling. I have also lived fulltime in an RV, whose contents, like a motorcycle being trailered, experience a constant earthquake while traveling. I have never suffered any damage. I have friends who have.

Jim G
 

·
Registered
2019 Ninja 400 ABS, Pearl Storm Gray
Joined
·
369 Posts
Boy, this is so much one of those "it depends" conversations... I can see arguments both ways -- higher attachment on the motorcycle (than the CG) can be really good if the wheels are secured with rails, but might actually be bad if they are not (because the CG would have leverage under the attachment point to try and slide the tires on the bed)... I am definitely a fan of rails, and shallow angles on straps scare me...

TLDR; If you've never had something in a trailer fall, keep doing what you are doing!!! (And if you have had something fall, thanks if you share why, so someone else might not have to make the same mistake!)
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top