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Just curious if fellow riders are adjusting chain tension with the rear wheel on the ground or elevated using a rear stand. When I last adjusted the tension, the bike was on a rear stand and the tensioning/alignment went well. Only small issue I encountered was the entire adjuster assembly at the end of the swingarm came loose and was tricky to keep fully seated.


I have since seen people adjusting tension with the bike on the side stand. Is this a better way to do this procedure, or is the rear stand preferred?
 

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I have since seen people adjusting tension with the bike on the side stand. Is this a better way to do this procedure, or is the rear stand preferred?

That is a fair and good question.. either way will work with the guide lines keeping you straight.. Manual states just put down the side stand and get to work..

That being said.. My last bike was a shaft drive and I been gone 10 years since then.. but if memory still works for me.. when I did have a chain, it was easier to use a stand so I could check and grease the chain at the same time.. you can pick up a rear stand pretty cheaply and they are not that big to store away someplace.. obviously jus'my opinion..
 

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Only small issue I encountered was the entire adjuster assembly at the end of the swingarm came loose and was tricky to keep fully seated.

I have since seen people adjusting tension with the bike on the side stand. Is this a better way to do this procedure, or is the rear stand preferred?
The same thing happened to me. I'd be willing to bet there's really no difference. I've adjusted my chain three times. Once on the side stand, once with a swingarm stand, and lastly with a spool stand. Only the first time did one of the plates that cover the end of the swingarm unseat and I rode around for a day without noticing it was crooked. Just backed out the adjuster, re-seated it, and haven't had a problem since.
 

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This is a job best done with the rear wheel on the ground as you don't ride with the rear wheel on a stand right? The best way to check your actual chain tension is to sit on the bike and then reach down and grip the chain and move it up and down to see how much slack you have. Or if you want to measure it then get a friend to do this while you remain sitting on the bike.

One tip to stop the blocks in the ends of the swingarm from coming loose is to only slacken off the rear axle nut enough so that you can just move the axle in the slot when you tighten the adjuster nuts. This will keep tension on the blocks and keep them firmly seated.
 

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This I guess is dependent the chain slack you choose.

I liked a tighter chain (preference from years of riding bicycles), and would adjust to the tighter side of the spec in the manual for my old 550. Then after sitting on the bike, I noticed the rider sag caused the chain to be really really tight. From then on, I adjusted to the loose side of the spec and haven't had to enlist the help of a friend anymore.

When I got the EX400 I verified adjusting to the loose side of the spec in the manual, that rider sag does not tighten the chain too much. Me being a painfully average 5'9" 145lbs this would work for most. When I sit on my bike the chain slack drops to 25mm of slack, just went out to the garage and checked for y'all.

So now I opt to adjust it on the stand and just verify at the tightest point in the chain it reads 30mm of slack.
 

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Just curious if fellow riders are adjusting chain tension with the rear wheel on the ground or elevated using a rear stand. When I last adjusted the tension, the bike was on a rear stand and the tensioning/alignment went well. Only small issue I encountered was the entire adjuster assembly at the end of the swingarm came loose and was tricky to keep fully seated.


I have since seen people adjusting tension with the bike on the side stand. Is this a better way to do this procedure, or is the rear stand preferred?
The owners manual is poorly edited, and misleading. It states to check the chain slack with the bike on the side stand. When it is also doable with it on a paddock stand because the sag remains unaltered regardless.

This is all more clearly and fully explained in the service manual. It also tells you how to measure for the drive chain wear. Yes there is a service limit for these chains.
 
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This is all more clearly and fully explained in the service manual. It also tells you how to measure for the drive chain wear. Yes there is a service limit for these chains.
This is exactly why I really need to scrape together some money for a copy of the manual..
 
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