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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I think these pictures better portray how dry these plates are. This is my original set that came with the bike. I reinstalled them about a week ago while I was experimenting and did at least 100km/60mi on them.

I never wiped them off, I took them out and straight into this plastic bag. Feeling in the bag, there isn't even an oil film left after removing the plates. These plates are dry, just like my current ones.
Note there is a ring of adhesive/lacquer 'build up' running in line with the top and bottom of the friction pads. This is not oil.

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From what I can remember, the steel plates, and the non-friction part of the friction plates, should be completely coated in a thin layer of oil when you pull them out. The friction parts of the plates might have oil soaked/absorbed into them. Like in Brian's video. Not dripping wet, but enough to get your gloves oily if you slide a finger over them. Not much different from the oiled plates that you're about to install.

Also see this image from Norton's installation guide:
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I'm tempted to start the bike with the clutch cover off to see if oil even comes through the shaft, but I'm guessing it would spray all over the place.
Maybe stretch on & use tape to secure some of that clear plastic food wrap, as a substitute for the engine cover? So you can see inside while it's running, while keeping any oil spray contained. No idea whether that'll work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
From what I can remember, the steel plates, and the non-friction part of the friction plates, should be completely coated in a thin layer of oil when you pull them out. The friction parts of the plates might have oil soaked/absorbed into them. Like in Brian's video. Not dripping wet, but enough to get your gloves oily if you slide a finger over them. Not much different from the oiled plates that you're about to install.

Also see this image from Norton's installation guide: View attachment 21004




Maybe stretch on & use tape to secure some of that clear plastic food wrap, as a substitute for the engine cover? So you can see inside while it's running, while keeping any oil spray contained. No idea whether that'll work.
The plates in that picture are positively saturated compared with my bone-dry units.

I've emailed Norton to see what they think.
 

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@Grantman ok those up-close pictures are better. Yeah that definitely looks dry, and also your video with the clutch cover is indeed interesting. Kinda cool to see what goes on inside. However, I don't think the lubrication of the clutch is based on the tolerance between the push rod and the hollow shaft it goes into. Mine are the same as yours (I also have a stock one and a Norton one). You definitely have something odd happening there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
@Grantman ok those up-close pictures are better. Yeah that definitely looks dry, and also your video with the clutch cover is indeed interesting. Kinda cool to see what goes on inside. However, I don't think the lubrication of the clutch is based on the tolerance between the push rod and the hollow shaft it goes into. Mine are the same as yours (I also have a stock one and a Norton one). You definitely have something odd happening there.
How do you think the clutch is oiled? I'm going off Brian's comments at 18:36 in this video, which make sense from what I can see of the clutch design.

 

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How do you think the clutch is oiled? I'm going off Brian's comments at 18:36 in this video, which make sense from what I can see of the clutch design.

I don't know, but it seems like there would barely be any oil in there then since it's such a tight tolerance, and mine is the same as yours. There's no play in the push rod. You can see in your video there is oil behind the clutch that starts moving around. I imagine you did that while on the stand, but when you're actually riding the bike around and leaning side to side, there's a lot more oil that makes it's way in there. I don't know though, just guessing. Now you gotta make yourself a plexiglass clutch cover, stick a GoPro on it and go for a ride so we can see what happens on a real ride :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
I don't know, but it seems like there would barely be any oil in there then since it's such a tight tolerance, and mine is the same as yours. There's no play in the push rod. You can see in your video there is oil behind the clutch that starts moving around. I imagine you did that while on the stand, but when you're actually riding the bike around and leaning side to side, there's a lot more oil that makes it's way in there. I don't know though, just guessing. Now you gotta make yourself a plexiglass clutch cover, stick a GoPro on it and go for a ride so we can see what happens on a real ride :D
I'm guessing the pull rod tolerance differences are so minimal it's not readily identifiable. At higher RPM when oil pressure is higher, a tiny difference would mean more.
You could be right, but in my mind it has to be primarily oiled from the clutch center and spun through the 3 small holes in the clutch hub. There's pressurized oil right there, it's got to be the primary source surely. If oiling was dependent on bike angle, bumping around, it would be too unpredictable. A smooth dragstrip or dyno could cause clutch oiling problems.

I really don't see how those 3 little holes around the clutch hub would get oil in a better way.

Any oil not pumped into the centre of the clutch is going to be spun off instantly without passing through the plates.

Would be good if someone else could start their bike without the clutch cover and see if they are getting any oil seepage coming out around the pull rod.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
At some point I'm prob going to get into butchering a pull rod.
I've had no joy with my Norton communication. After a couple of attempts I'm still getting the low level advice - setting clutch lever fee play, recommending Barnett clutch fibers, recommend taking bike to trained and licensed professional etc.

I've emailed Yoyodyne next. I don't blame them if they don't reply.


Oh for Christ’s sake. Just slather some moly-disulfide grease on ‘um and be done with it. It’s an old Ducati trick.
That'll make my wannabe Ducati clutch legit!
 

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Some racers I know (names will not be mentioned) drill more holes in the hub. But it’s mainly to help on starts. After that the clutch barely gets used.

Try putting the stock pull rod back in and see if it changes anything. Better yet, get the updated Kawasaki pull rod and bearing.
 

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Looks good to me


Anyways, the only thing I can think of is that is that no oil goes to the clutch unless its leaned over to the right. Too much lube sounds bad and dirty. I'll be taking my cover off to put some stiffer springs soon so I'll report back with how wet :sneaky: my clutch is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 · (Edited)
I've just tried my stock clutch pull rod with clutch cover off, engine running, and no oil seeping around it either.

I'm sure you already looked at the Norton post but it has some good pictures to compare between the stock and aftermarket hub design. Hopefully Norton gets back to you and might have a good explanation.

https://www.norton-motorsports.com/...trals-and-dropping-gears-explained-and-fixed/
I hadn't noticed all the Yoyodyne pictures before. In fact, there's a lot more pictures of everything since I last looked.
Noting the Yoyodyne inner clutch hub looks to have around 25 holes to allow oil to pass through to the plates. The stock clutch hub has 3 holes, slightly bigger. Rear middle and front.



 
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